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      Whole genome sequencing of NDM-1-producing serotype K1 ST23 hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae in China

      1 , 2

      Journal of Medical Microbiology

      Microbiology Society

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          Hypervirulent (hypermucoviscous) Klebsiella pneumoniae

          A new hypervirulent (hypermucoviscous) variant of Klebsiella pneumoniae has emerged. First described in the Asian Pacific Rim, it now increasingly recognized in Western countries. Defining clinical features are the ability to cause serious, life-threatening community-acquired infection in younger healthy hosts, including liver abscess, pneumonia, meningitis and endophthalmitis and the ability to metastatically spread, an unusual feature for enteric Gram-negative bacilli in the non-immunocompromised. Despite infecting a healthier population, significant morbidity and mortality occurs. Although epidemiologic features are still being defined, colonization, particularly intestinal colonization, appears to be a critical step leading to infection. However the route of entry remains unclear. The majority of cases described to date are in Asians, raising the issue of a genetic predisposition vs. geospecific strain acquisition. The traits that enhance its virulence when compared with “classical” K. pneumoniae are the ability to more efficiently acquire iron and perhaps an increase in capsule production, which confers the hypermucoviscous phenotype. An objective diagnostic test suitable for routine use in the clinical microbiology laboratory is needed. If/when these strains become increasingly resistant to antimicrobials, we will be faced with a frightening clinical scenario.
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            Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess: a new invasive syndrome.

            Klebsiella pneumoniae is a well known human nosocomial pathogen. Most community-acquired K pneumoniae infections cause pneumonia or urinary tract infections. During the past two decades, however, a distinct invasive syndrome that causes liver abscesses has been increasingly reported in Asia, and this syndrome is emerging as a global disease. In this Review, we summarise the clinical presentation and management as well the microbiological aspects of this invasive disease. Diabetes mellitus and two specific capsular types in the bacterium predispose a patient to the development of liver abscesses and the following metastatic complications: bacteraemia, meningitis, endophthalmitis, and necrotising fasciitis. For patients with this invasive syndrome, appropriate antimicrobial treatment combined with percutaneous drainage of liver abscesses increases their chances of survival. Rapid detection of the hypervirulent strain that causes this syndrome allows earlier diagnosis and treatment, thus minimising the occurrence of sequelae and improving clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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              Klebsiella pneumoniae genotype K1: an emerging pathogen that causes septic ocular or central nervous system complications from pyogenic liver abscess.

              Since 1986, researchers have noted a syndrome of Klebsiella pneumoniae pyogenic liver abscess that is complicated by endophthalmitis or central nervous system infections. There are limited data regarding the role of bacterial genotype in the pathogenesis of this syndrome. We conducted a retrospective cohort study involving 177 cases of K. pneumoniae pyogenic liver abscess treated during 1997-2005 at a tertiary university hospital in Taiwan. We performed bacterial cps genotyping by polymerase chain reaction detection of serotype-specific alleles at wzy and wzx loci and used an in vitro serum assay to evaluate the virulence of bacterial strains. Septic ocular or central nervous system complications developed in 23 patients (13%). Logistic regression analysis showed that genotype K1 was the only significant risk factor (adjusted odds ratio, 4.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-15.7, P=.009). The serum resistance assay indicated that, on average, K1 strains (n=100) were significantly more virulent than were strains of K2 (n=36), K20/K5/K54 (n=21), or other genotypes (n=20) (P<.001 for each comparison). In addition to the serotype-specific cps region, the genomic background of K1 strains also differed significantly from that of non-K1 strains (20-kb kfu/PTS region, 97/100 vs. 13/77; P<.001). Of the 19 cases in which genotype K1 strains caused complications, 8 patients (42%) did not have identifiable underlying medical diseases. K. pneumoniae genotype K1 is an emerging pathogen capable of causing catastrophic septic ocular or central nervous system complications from pyogenic liver abscess independent of underlying diseases in the host.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Medical Microbiology
                Microbiology Society
                0022-2615
                1473-5644
                June 01 2019
                June 01 2019
                : 68
                : 6
                : 866-873
                Affiliations
                [1 ] 1 College of Veterinary Medicine, Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao, PR China
                [2 ] 2 Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Qingdao, PR China
                Article
                10.1099/jmm.0.000996
                © 2019

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