Blog
About

  • Record: found
  • Abstract: found
  • Article: found
Is Open Access

The Rotterdam Study: 2016 objectives and design update

Read this article at

Bookmark
      There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

      Abstract

      The Rotterdam Study is a prospective cohort study ongoing since 1990 in the city of Rotterdam in The Netherlands. The study targets cardiovascular, endocrine, hepatic, neurological, ophthalmic, psychiatric, dermatological, otolaryngological, locomotor, and respiratory diseases. As of 2008, 14,926 subjects aged 45 years or over comprise the Rotterdam Study cohort. The findings of the Rotterdam Study have been presented in over 1200 research articles and reports (see www.erasmus-epidemiology.nl/rotterdamstudy). This article gives the rationale of the study and its design. It also presents a summary of the major findings and an update of the objectives and methods.

      Related collections

      Most cited references 363

      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Critical evaluation of the Newcastle-Ottawa scale for the assessment of the quality of nonrandomized studies in meta-analyses.

       Andreas Stang (2010)
        Bookmark
        • Record: found
        • Abstract: found
        • Article: not found

        Global and regional burden of disease and risk factors, 2001: systematic analysis of population health data.

        Our aim was to calculate the global burden of disease and risk factors for 2001, to examine regional trends from 1990 to 2001, and to provide a starting point for the analysis of the Disease Control Priorities Project (DCPP). We calculated mortality, incidence, prevalence, and disability adjusted life years (DALYs) for 136 diseases and injuries, for seven income/geographic country groups. To assess trends, we re-estimated all-cause mortality for 1990 with the same methods as for 2001. We estimated mortality and disease burden attributable to 19 risk factors. About 56 million people died in 2001. Of these, 10.6 million were children, 99% of whom lived in low-and-middle-income countries. More than half of child deaths in 2001 were attributable to acute respiratory infections, measles, diarrhoea, malaria, and HIV/AIDS. The ten leading diseases for global disease burden were perinatal conditions, lower respiratory infections, ischaemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, HIV/AIDS, diarrhoeal diseases, unipolar major depression, malaria, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and tuberculosis. There was a 20% reduction in global disease burden per head due to communicable, maternal, perinatal, and nutritional conditions between 1990 and 2001. Almost half the disease burden in low-and-middle-income countries is now from non-communicable diseases (disease burden per head in Sub-Saharan Africa and the low-and-middle-income countries of Europe and Central Asia increased between 1990 and 2001). Undernutrition remains the leading risk factor for health loss. An estimated 45% of global mortality and 36% of global disease burden are attributable to the joint hazardous effects of the 19 risk factors studied. Uncertainty in all-cause mortality estimates ranged from around 1% in high-income countries to 15-20% in Sub-Saharan Africa. Uncertainty was larger for mortality from specific diseases, and for incidence and prevalence of non-fatal outcomes. Despite uncertainties about mortality and burden of disease estimates, our findings suggest that substantial gains in health have been achieved in most populations, countered by the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Sub-Saharan Africa and setbacks in adult mortality in countries of the former Soviet Union. Our results on major disease, injury, and risk factor causes of loss of health, together with information on the cost-effectiveness of interventions, can assist in accelerating progress towards better health and reducing the persistent differentials in health between poor and rich countries.
          Bookmark
          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          GenABEL: an R library for genome-wide association analysis.

          Here we describe an R library for genome-wide association (GWA) analysis. It implements effective storage and handling of GWA data, fast procedures for genetic data quality control, testing of association of single nucleotide polymorphisms with binary or quantitative traits, visualization of results and also provides easy interfaces to standard statistical and graphical procedures implemented in base R and special R libraries for genetic analysis. We evaluated GenABEL using one simulated and two real data sets. We conclude that GenABEL enables the analysis of GWA data on desktop computers. http://cran.r-project.org.
            Bookmark

            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [ ]Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus Medical Center, PO Box 2040, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands
            [ ]Department of Pulmonary Diseases, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
            [ ]Department of Internal Medicine, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
            [ ]Department of Gastro-Enterology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
            [ ]Department of Cardiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
            [ ]Department of Otolaryngology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
            [ ]Department of Neurology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
            [ ]Department of Radiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
            [ ]Department of Ophthalmology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
            [ ]Department of Dermatology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
            [ ]Department of Psychiatry, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
            Contributors
            a.hofman@erasmusmc.nl
            Journal
            Eur J Epidemiol
            Eur. J. Epidemiol
            European Journal of Epidemiology
            Springer Netherlands (Dordrecht )
            0393-2990
            1573-7284
            19 September 2015
            19 September 2015
            2015
            : 30
            : 8
            : 661-708
            26386597
            4579264
            82
            10.1007/s10654-015-0082-x
            © The Author(s) 2015

            Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

            Categories
            Study Update
            Custom metadata
            © Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

            Comments

            Comment on this article