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      Looking for Medications to Support the Treatment of Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

      a , b , *

      Cardiology

      S. Karger AG

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          Most cited references 9

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          Diuretic response in acute heart failure: clinical characteristics and prognostic significance.

          Diminished diuretic response is common in patients with acute heart failure, although a clinically useful definition is lacking. Our aim was to investigate a practical, workable metric for diuretic response, examine associated patient characteristics and relationships with outcome. We examined diuretic response (defined as Δ weight kg/40 mg furosemide) in 1745 hospitalized acute heart failure patients from the PROTECT trial. Day 4 response was used to allow maximum differentiation in responsiveness and tailoring of diuretic doses to clinical response, following sensitivity analyses. We investigated predictors of diuretic response and relationships with outcome. The median diuretic response was -0.38 (-0.80 to -0.13) kg/40 mg furosemide. Poor diuretic response was independently associated with low systolic blood pressure, high blood urea nitrogen, diabetes, and atherosclerotic disease (all P < 0.05). Worse diuretic response independently predicted 180-day mortality (HR: 1.42; 95% CI: 1.11-1.81, P = 0.005), 60-day death or renal or cardiovascular rehospitalization (HR: 1.34; 95% CI: 1.14-1.59, P < 0.001) and 60-day HF rehospitalization (HR: 1.57; 95% CI: 1.24-2.01, P < 0.001) in multivariable models. The proposed metric-weight loss indexed to diuretic dose-better captures a dose-response relationship. Model diagnostics showed diuretic response provided essentially the same or slightly better prognostic information compared with its individual components (weight loss and diuretic dose) in this population, while providing a less biased, more easily interpreted signal. Worse diuretic response was associated with more advanced heart failure, renal impairment, diabetes, atherosclerotic disease and in-hospital worsening heart failure, and predicts mortality and heart failure rehospitalization in this post hoc, hypothesis-generating study. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
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            Timing of hemoconcentration during treatment of acute decompensated heart failure and subsequent survival: importance of sustained decongestion.

            This study sought to determine if the timing of hemoconcentration influences associated survival.
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              Prevalence, predictors and clinical outcome of residual congestion in acute decompensated heart failure

              Congestion is the main reason for hospital admission for acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). A better understanding of the clinical course of congestion and factors associated with decongestion are therefore important. We studied the clinical course, predictors and prognostic value of congestion in a cohort of patients admitted for ADHF by including different indirect markers of congestion (residual clinical congestion, brain natriuretic peptides (BNP) trajectories, hemoconcentration or diuretic response).
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                CRD
                Cardiology
                10.1159/issn.0008-6312
                Cardiology
                S. Karger AG
                0008-6312
                1421-9751
                2020
                April 2020
                04 March 2020
                : 145
                : 4
                : 224-226
                Affiliations
                aDepartment of Heart Diseases, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland
                bDepartment of Intensive Cardiac Therapy, National Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw, Poland
                Author notes
                *Janina Stepinska, Department of Intensive Cardiac Therapy, National Institute of Cardiology, Alpejska 42, PL–04628 Warsaw (Poland), janina@stepinska.pl.pl
                Article
                505902 Cardiology 2020;145:224–226
                10.1159/000505902
                32134399
                © 2020 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Pages: 3
                Categories
                HF and Intensive Care: Editorial Comment

                General medicine, Neurology, Cardiovascular Medicine, Internal medicine, Nephrology

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