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      Feeding problems in infancy and early childhood: evolutionary concept analysis

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          Most cited references59

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          The epidemiology of autism spectrum disorders.

          Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are complex, lifelong, neurodevelopmental conditions of largely unknown cause. They are much more common than previously believed, second in frequency only to mental retardation among the serious developmental disorders. Although a heritable component has been demonstrated in ASD etiology, putative risk genes have yet to be identified. Environmental risk factors may also play a role, perhaps via complex gene-environment interactions, but no specific exposures with significant population effects are known. A number of endogenous biomarkers associated with autism risk have been investigated, and these may help identify significant biologic pathways that, in turn, will aid in the discovery of specific genes and exposures. Future epidemiologic research should focus on expanding population-based descriptive data on ASDs, exploring candidate risk factors in large well-designed studies incorporating both genetic and environmental exposure data and addressing possible etiologic heterogeneity in studies that can stratify case groups and consider alternate endophenotypes.
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            Correlates of specific childhood feeding problems

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              Assessment of pediatric dysphagia and feeding disorders: clinical and instrumental approaches.

              J Arvedson (2007)
              Assessment of infants and children with dysphagia (swallowing problems) and feeding disorders involves significantly more considerations than a clinical observation of a feeding. In addition to the status of feeding in the child, considerations include health status, broad environment, parent-child interactions, and parental concerns. Interdisciplinary team approaches allow for coordinated global assessment and management decisions. Underlying etiologies or diagnoses must be delineated to every extent possible because treatment will vary according to history and current status in light of all factors that are often interrelated in complex ways. A holistic approach to evaluation is stressed with a primary goal for every child to receive adequate nutrition and hydration without health complications and with no stress to child or to caregiver. Instrumental swallow examinations that aid in defining physiological swallowing status are needed for some children. Successful oral feeding must be measured in quality of meal time experiences with best possible oral sensorimotor skills and safe swallowing while not jeopardizing a child's functional health status or the parent-child relationship. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Advanced Nursing
                J Adv Nurs
                Wiley
                03092402
                January 2017
                January 2017
                September 23 2016
                : 73
                : 1
                : 56-70
                Affiliations
                [1 ]School of Nursing; Duke University; Durham North Carolina USA
                [2 ]School of Nursing; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; North Carolina USA
                [3 ]Connell School of Nursing; Boston College; Chestnut Hill Massachusetts USA
                [4 ]University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; North Carolina USA
                Article
                10.1111/jan.13140
                44b56fda-2a0e-4aef-86e1-384e8865166a
                © 2016

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

                http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/termsAndConditions


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