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      Detection and isolation of the α-proteobacteriumAsaiainCulexmosquitoes

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          Most cited references 9

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          Deep sequencing reveals extensive variation in the gut microbiota of wild mosquitoes from Kenya.

          The mosquito midgut is a hostile environment that vector-borne parasites must survive to be transmitted. Commensal bacteria in the midgut can reduce the ability of mosquitoes to transmit disease, either by having direct anti-parasite effects or by stimulating basal immune responses of the insect host. As different bacteria have different effects on parasite development, the composition of the bacterial community in the mosquito gut is likely to affect the probability of disease transmission. We investigated the diversity of mosquito gut bacteria in the field using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA to build up a comprehensive picture of the diversity of gut bacteria in eight mosquito species in this population. We found that mosquito gut typically has a very simple gut microbiota that is dominated by a single bacterial taxon. Although different mosquito species share remarkably similar gut bacteria, individuals in a population are extremely variable and can have little overlap in the bacterial taxa present in their guts. This may be an important factor in causing differences in disease transmission rates within mosquito populations. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
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            Selection of models of DNA evolution with jModelTest.

             David Posada (2008)
            jModelTest is a bioinformatic tool for choosing among different models of nucleotide substitution. The program implements five different model selection strategies, including hierarchical and dynamical likelihood ratio tests (hLRT and dLRT), Akaike and Bayesian information criteria (AIC and BIC), and a performance-based decision theory method (DT). The output includes estimates of model selection uncertainty, parameter importance, and model-averaged parameter estimates, including model-averaged phylogenies. jModelTest is a Java program that runs under Mac OSX, Windows, and Unix systems with a Java Run Environment installed, and it can be freely downloaded from (http://darwin.uvigo.es).
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              Predicting St. Louis encephalitis virus epidemics: lessons from recent, and not so recent, outbreaks.

               Tyler Day (2000)
              St. Louis encephalitis virus was first identified as the cause of human disease in North America after a large urban epidemic in St. Louis, Missouri, during the summer of 1933. Since then, numerous outbreaks of St. Louis encephalitis have occurred throughout the continent. In south Florida, a 1990 epidemic lasted from August 1990 through January 1991 and resulted in 226 clinical cases and 11 deaths in 28 counties. This epidemic severely disrupted normal activities throughout the southern half of the state for 5 months and adversely impacted tourism in the affected region. The accurate forecasting of mosquito-borne arboviral epidemics will help minimize their impact on urban and rural population centers. Epidemic predictability would help focus control efforts and public education about epidemic risks, transmission patterns, and elements of personal protection that reduce the probability of arboviral infection. Research associated with arboviral outbreaks has provided an understanding of the strengths and weaknesses associated with epidemic prediction. The purpose of this paper is to review lessons from past arboviral epidemics and determine how these observations might aid our ability to predict and respond to future outbreaks.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Medical and Veterinary Entomology
                Med Vet Entomol
                Wiley
                0269283X
                December 2014
                December 2014
                December 26 2013
                : 28
                : 4
                : 438-442
                Affiliations
                [1 ]School of Biosciences and Biotechnology; University of Camerino; Camerino Italy
                [2 ]Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Section of Parasitology; Sapienza University of Rome; Rome Italy
                Article
                10.1111/mve.12045
                © 2013
                Product
                Self URI (article page): http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/mve.12045

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