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      Subtractive Color Filters Based on a Silicon-Aluminum Hybrid-Nanodisk Metasurface Enabling Enhanced Color Purity

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          Abstract

          Highly efficient subtractive tri-color filters of cyan, magenta, and yellow with enhanced color purity and robustness have been proposed and realized, by exploiting a silicon-aluminum (Si-Al) hybrid-nanodisk (ND) metasurface atop a Si substrate. The aspect ratio of the Si-Al hybrid ND is much lower than that of the conventional Si nanowire, which is disadvantageous due to its fragility and low color purity. In response to incident light impinging upon the metasurface, the hybrid-NDs individually play the role in exciting a magnetic dipole (MD) resonance through the mediation of Mie-scattering between the hybrid ND and air. The light stored in the resonance is coupled to the substrate, giving rise to a suppressed reflection. By virtue of the top Al ND, the excited MD resonance is strongly confined by the Si ND. As a consequence, a near-zero resonant dip that exhibits high off-resonance reflection and narrow bandwidth is produced for embodying highly efficient tri-color filters with enhanced color purity. The spectral position can be tuned by a simple adjustment of the hybrid-ND diameter. A full-color palette was successfully created with a high color purity and large color gamut. The proposed devices may be applied for photorealistic high-resolution color printing and holographic displays.

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          Negative refraction makes a perfect lens

          With a conventional lens sharpness of the image is always limited by the wavelength of light. An unconventional alternative to a lens, a slab of negative refractive index material, has the power to focus all Fourier components of a 2D image, even those that do not propagate in a radiative manner. Such "superlenses" can be realized in the microwave band with current technology. Our simulations show that a version of the lens operating at the frequency of visible light can be realized in the form of a thin slab of silver. This optical version resolves objects only a few nanometers across.
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            Tailoring directional scattering through magnetic and electric resonances in subwavelength silicon nanodisks.

            Interference of optically induced electric and magnetic modes in high-index all-dielectric nanoparticles offers unique opportunities for tailoring directional scattering and engineering the flow of light. In this article we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the interference of electric and magnetic optically induced modes in individual subwavelength silicon nanodisks can lead to the suppression of resonant backscattering and to enhanced resonant forward scattering of light. To this end we spectrally tune the nanodisk's fundamental electric and magnetic resonances with respect to each other by a variation of the nanodisk aspect ratio. This ability to tune two modes of different character within the same nanoparticle provides direct control over their interference, and, in consequence, allows for engineering the particle's resonant and off-resonant scattering patterns. Most importantly, measured and numerically calculated transmittance spectra reveal that backward scattering can be suppressed and forward scattering can be enhanced at resonance for the particular case of overlapping electric and magnetic resonances. Our experimental results are in good agreement with calculations based on the discrete dipole approach as well as finite-integral frequency-domain simulations. Furthermore, we show useful applications of silicon nanodisks with tailored resonances as optical nanoantennas with strong unidirectional emission from a dipole source.
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              Printing colour at the optical diffraction limit.

              The highest possible resolution for printed colour images is determined by the diffraction limit of visible light. To achieve this limit, individual colour elements (or pixels) with a pitch of 250 nm are required, translating into printed images at a resolution of ∼100,000 dots per inch (d.p.i.). However, methods for dispensing multiple colourants or fabricating structural colour through plasmonic structures have insufficient resolution and limited scalability. Here, we present a non-colourant method that achieves bright-field colour prints with resolutions up to the optical diffraction limit. Colour information is encoded in the dimensional parameters of metal nanostructures, so that tuning their plasmon resonance determines the colours of the individual pixels. Our colour-mapping strategy produces images with both sharp colour changes and fine tonal variations, is amenable to large-volume colour printing via nanoimprint lithography, and could be useful in making microimages for security, steganography, nanoscale optical filters and high-density spectrally encoded optical data storage.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Sci Rep
                Sci Rep
                Scientific Reports
                Nature Publishing Group
                2045-2322
                13 July 2016
                2016
                : 6
                : 29756
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Electronic Engineering, Kwangwoon University , 20 Kwangwoon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul 01897, South Korea
                [2 ]Laser Physics Centre, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University , Canberra ACT 0200, Australia
                Author notes
                Article
                srep29756
                10.1038/srep29756
                4942830
                27407024
                44d50fc7-f64b-4075-a550-737dc5ac091e
                Copyright © 2016, Macmillan Publishers Limited

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                History
                : 09 May 2016
                : 22 June 2016
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