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      The RCSB Protein Data Bank: views of structural biology for basic and applied research and education

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          Abstract

          The RCSB Protein Data Bank (RCSB PDB, http://www.rcsb.org) provides access to 3D structures of biological macromolecules and is one of the leading resources in biology and biomedicine worldwide. Our efforts over the past 2 years focused on enabling a deeper understanding of structural biology and providing new structural views of biology that support both basic and applied research and education. Herein, we describe recently introduced data annotations including integration with external biological resources, such as gene and drug databases, new visualization tools and improved support for the mobile web. We also describe access to data files, web services and open access software components to enable software developers to more effectively mine the PDB archive and related annotations. Our efforts are aimed at expanding the role of 3D structure in understanding biology and medicine.

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          Most cited references 48

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          Activities at the Universal Protein Resource (UniProt)

          The mission of the Universal Protein Resource (UniProt) (http://www.uniprot.org) is to provide the scientific community with a comprehensive, high-quality and freely accessible resource of protein sequences and functional annotation. It integrates, interprets and standardizes data from literature and numerous resources to achieve the most comprehensive catalog possible of protein information. The central activities are the biocuration of the UniProt Knowledgebase and the dissemination of these data through our Web site and web services. UniProt is produced by the UniProt Consortium, which consists of groups from the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI), the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB) and the Protein Information Resource (PIR). UniProt is updated and distributed every 4 weeks and can be accessed online for searches or downloads.
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            BioMagResBank

            The BioMagResBank (BMRB: www.bmrb.wisc.edu) is a repository for experimental and derived data gathered from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies of biological molecules. BMRB is a partner in the Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB). The BMRB archive consists of four main data depositories: (i) quantitative NMR spectral parameters for proteins, peptides, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and ligands or cofactors (assigned chemical shifts, coupling constants and peak lists) and derived data (relaxation parameters, residual dipolar couplings, hydrogen exchange rates, pKa values, etc.), (ii) databases for NMR restraints processed from original author depositions available from the Protein Data Bank, (iii) time-domain (raw) spectral data from NMR experiments used to assign spectral resonances and determine the structures of biological macromolecules and (iv) a database of one- and two-dimensional 1H and 13C one- and two-dimensional NMR spectra for over 250 metabolites. The BMRB website provides free access to all of these data. BMRB has tools for querying the archive and retrieving information and an ftp site (ftp.bmrb.wisc.edu) where data in the archive can be downloaded in bulk. Two BMRB mirror sites exist: one at the PDBj, Protein Research Institute, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan (bmrb.protein.osaka-u.ac.jp) and the other at CERM, University of Florence, Florence, Italy (bmrb.postgenomicnmr.net/). The site at Osaka also accepts and processes data depositions.
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              Data growth and its impact on the SCOP database: new developments

              The Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database is a comprehensive ordering of all proteins of known structure, according to their evolutionary and structural relationships. The SCOP hierarchy comprises the following levels: Species, Protein, Family, Superfamily, Fold and Class. While keeping the original classification scheme intact, we have changed the production of SCOP in order to cope with a rapid growth of new structural data and to facilitate the discovery of new protein relationships. We describe ongoing developments and new features implemented in SCOP. A new update protocol supports batch classification of new protein structures by their detected relationships at Family and Superfamily levels in contrast to our previous sequential handling of new structural data by release date. We introduce pre-SCOP, a preview of the SCOP developmental version that enables earlier access to the information on new relationships. We also discuss the impact of worldwide Structural Genomics initiatives, which are producing new protein structures at an increasing rate, on the rates of discovery and growth of protein families and superfamilies. SCOP can be accessed at http://scop.mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk/scop.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nucleic Acids Res
                Nucleic Acids Res
                nar
                nar
                Nucleic Acids Research
                Oxford University Press
                0305-1048
                1362-4962
                28 January 2015
                26 November 2014
                26 November 2014
                : 43
                : Database issue , Database issue
                : D345-D356
                Affiliations
                [1 ]RCSB Protein Data Bank, San Diego Supercomputer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
                [2 ]RCSB Protein Data Bank, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology and Center for Integrative Proteomics Research, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA
                [3 ]Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA
                [4 ]Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
                Author notes
                [* ]To whom correspondence should be addressed. Tel: +1 858 822 5497; Email: pwrose@ 123456ucsd.edu
                Correspondence may also be addressed to Stephen K. Burley. Tel: +1 848 445 5144; Email: sburley@ 123456proteomics.rutgers.edu
                Article
                10.1093/nar/gku1214
                4383988
                25428375
                © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Page count
                Pages: 12
                Product
                Categories
                Database Issue
                Custom metadata
                28 January 2015

                Genetics

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