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      The condensin complex is a mechanochemical motor that translocates along DNA

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      Science

      American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

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          Abstract

          Condensin plays crucial roles in chromosome organization and compaction, but the mechanistic basis for its functions remains obscure. Here, we use single-molecule imaging to demonstrate that Saccharomyces cerevisiae condensin is a molecular motor capable of ATP hydrolysis-dependent translocation along double-stranded DNA. Condensin’s translocation activity is rapid and highly processive, with individual complexes traveling an average distance of ≥10 kilobases at a velocity of ~60 base pairs per second. Our results suggest that condensin may take steps comparable in length to its ~50-nanometer coiled-coil subunits, suggestive of a translocation mechanism that is distinct from any reported DNA motor protein. The finding that condensin is a mechanochemical motor has important implications for understanding the mechanisms of chromosome organization and condensation.

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          Most cited references 39

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          Structure and mechanism of helicases and nucleic acid translocases.

          Helicases and translocases are a ubiquitous, highly diverse group of proteins that perform an extraordinary variety of functions in cells. Consequently, this review sets out to define a nomenclature for these enzymes based on current knowledge of sequence, structure, and mechanism. Using previous definitions of helicase families as a basis, we delineate six superfamilies of enzymes, with examples of crystal structures where available, and discuss these structures in the context of biochemical data to outline our present understanding of helicase and translocase activity. As a result, each superfamily is subdivided, where appropriate, on the basis of mechanistic understanding, which we hope will provide a framework for classification of new superfamily members as they are discovered and characterized.
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            Cohesin: its roles and mechanisms.

            The cohesin complex is a major constituent of interphase and mitotic chromosomes. Apart from its role in mediating sister chromatid cohesion, it is also important for DNA double-strand-break repair and transcriptional control. The functions of cohesin are regulated by phosphorylation, acetylation, ATP hydrolysis, and site-specific proteolysis. Recent evidence suggests that cohesin acts as a novel topological device that traps chromosomal DNA within a large tripartite ring formed by its core subunits.
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              Myosin V walks hand-over-hand: single fluorophore imaging with 1.5-nm localization.

              Myosin V is a dimeric molecular motor that moves processively on actin, with the center of mass moving approximately 37 nanometers for each adenosine triphosphate hydrolyzed. We have labeled myosin V with a single fluorophore at different positions in the light-chain domain and measured the step size with a standard deviation of <1.5 nanometers, with 0.5-second temporal resolution, and observation times of minutes. The step size alternates between 37 + 2x nm and 37 - 2x, where x is the distance along the direction of motion between the dye and the midpoint between the two heads. These results strongly support a hand-over-hand model of motility, not an inchworm model.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Science
                Science
                American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
                0036-8075
                1095-9203
                November 02 2017
                November 03 2017
                November 03 2017
                September 07 2017
                : 358
                : 6363
                : 672-676
                Article
                10.1126/science.aan6516
                5862036
                28882993
                © 2017

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