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      The Long-Run Effects of School Racial Diversity on Political Identity

      1 , 2 , 3
      American Economic Review: Insights
      American Economic Association

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          Abstract

          How do early-life experiences shape political identity? We examine the end of race-based busing in Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, an event that led to large changes in school racial composition. Using administrative data, we compare party affiliation in adulthood for students who had lived on opposite sides of newly drawn school boundaries. Consistent with the contact hypothesis, we find that a 10 percentage point increase in the share of minorities in a White student’s assigned school decreased their likelihood of registering as a Republican by 2 percentage points (12 percent). Our results suggest that schools in childhood play an important role in shaping partisanship. (JEL D72, H75, I21, I28, J15)

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          Most cited references57

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          A meta-analytic test of intergroup contact theory.

          The present article presents a meta-analytic test of intergroup contact theory. With 713 independent samples from 515 studies, the meta-analysis finds that intergroup contact typically reduces intergroup prejudice. Multiple tests indicate that this finding appears not to result from either participant selection or publication biases, and the more rigorous studies yield larger mean effects. These contact effects typically generalize to the entire outgroup, and they emerge across a broad range of outgroup targets and contact settings. Similar patterns also emerge for samples with racial or ethnic targets and samples with other targets. This result suggests that contact theory, devised originally for racial and ethnic encounters, can be extended to other groups. A global indicator of Allport's optimal contact conditions demonstrates that contact under these conditions typically leads to even greater reduction in prejudice. Closer examination demonstrates that these conditions are best conceptualized as an interrelated bundle rather than as independent factors. Further, the meta-analytic findings indicate that these conditions are not essential for prejudice reduction. Hence, future work should focus on negative factors that prevent intergroup contact from diminishing prejudice as well as the development of a more comprehensive theory of intergroup contact. Copyright 2006 APA.
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            A Rational Theory of the Size of Government

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              Do Better Schools Matter? Parental Valuation of Elementary Education

              S E Black (1999)
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                American Economic Review: Insights
                American Economic Review: Insights
                American Economic Association
                2640-205X
                2640-2068
                September 01 2021
                September 01 2021
                : 3
                : 3
                : 267-284
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Leeds School of Business, University of Colorado-Boulder (email: )
                [2 ]Department of Economics, Dartmouth College, and the National Bureau of Economic Research ()
                [3 ]Social and Decision Sciences, Carnegie Mellon University ()
                Article
                10.1257/aeri.20200336
                456c2312-67ab-4257-8503-4905cd532ffa
                © 2021
                History

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