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      Automated segmentation of visceral and subcutaneous (deep and superficial) adipose tissues in normal and overweight men : Automated Segmentation of Adipose Tissue

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          Most cited references 32

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          Scale-space and edge detection using anisotropic diffusion

           P Perona,  S J Malik (1990)
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            Abdominal visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue compartments: association with metabolic risk factors in the Framingham Heart Study.

            Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) compartments may confer increased metabolic risk. The incremental utility of measuring both visceral and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (SAT) in association with metabolic risk factors and underlying heritability has not been well described in a population-based setting. Participants (n=3001) were drawn from the Framingham Heart Study (48% women; mean age, 50 years), were free of clinical cardiovascular disease, and underwent multidetector computed tomography assessment of SAT and VAT volumes between 2002 and 2005. Metabolic risk factors were examined in relation to increments of SAT and VAT after multivariable adjustment. Heritability was calculated using variance-components analysis. Among both women and men, SAT and VAT were significantly associated with blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and with increased odds of hypertension, impaired fasting glucose, diabetes mellitus, and metabolic syndrome (P range < 0.01). In women, relations between VAT and risk factors were consistently stronger than in men. However, VAT was more strongly correlated with most metabolic risk factors than was SAT. For example, among women and men, both SAT and VAT were associated with increased odds of metabolic syndrome. In women, the odds ratio (OR) of metabolic syndrome per 1-standard deviation increase in VAT (OR, 4.7) was stronger than that for SAT (OR, 3.0; P for difference between SAT and VAT < 0.0001); similar differences were noted for men (OR for VAT, 4.2; OR for SAT, 2.5). Furthermore, VAT but not SAT contributed significantly to risk factor variation after adjustment for body mass index and waist circumference (P < or = 0.01). Among overweight and obese individuals, the prevalence of hypertension, impaired fasting glucose, and metabolic syndrome increased linearly and significantly across increasing VAT quartiles. Heritability values for SAT and VAT were 57% and 36%, respectively. Although both SAT and VAT are correlated with metabolic risk factors, VAT remains more strongly associated with an adverse metabolic risk profile even after accounting for standard anthropometric indexes. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesized role of visceral fat as a unique, pathogenic fat depot. Measurement of VAT may provide a more complete understanding of metabolic risk associated with variation in fat distribution.
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              An experimental comparison of min-cut/max-flow algorithms for energy minimization in vision.

              After [15], [31], [19], [8], [25], [5], minimum cut/maximum flow algorithms on graphs emerged as an increasingly useful tool for exact or approximate energy minimization in low-level vision. The combinatorial optimization literature provides many min-cut/max-flow algorithms with different polynomial time complexity. Their practical efficiency, however, has to date been studied mainly outside the scope of computer vision. The goal of this paper is to provide an experimental comparison of the efficiency of min-cut/max flow algorithms for applications in vision. We compare the running times of several standard algorithms, as well as a new algorithm that we have recently developed. The algorithms we study include both Goldberg-Tarjan style "push-relabel" methods and algorithms based on Ford-Fulkerson style "augmenting paths." We benchmark these algorithms on a number of typical graphs in the contexts of image restoration, stereo, and segmentation. In many cases, our new algorithm works several times faster than any of the other methods, making near real-time performance possible. An implementation of our max-flow/min-cut algorithm is available upon request for research purposes.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging
                J. Magn. Reson. Imaging
                Wiley
                10531807
                April 2015
                April 2015
                May 07 2014
                : 41
                : 4
                : 924-934
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, Agency for Science, Technology & Research (A*STAR); Singapore
                [2 ]Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology; Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore and National University Health System; Singapore
                [3 ]Singapore Bioimaging Consortium, Agency for Science, Technology & Research (A*STAR); Singapore
                [4 ]Department of Endocrinology; Tan Tock Seng Hospital; Singapore
                [5 ]Department of Medicine; Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore and National University Health System; Singapore
                [6 ]Department of Diagnostic Radiology; Khoo Teck Puat Hospital; Singapore
                [7 ]Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore and National University Health System; Singapore
                [8 ]Department of Pediatrics; Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore and National University Health System; Singapore
                [9 ]Clinical Imaging Research Centre, Agency for Science, Technology & Research (A*STAR); Singapore
                Article
                10.1002/jmri.24655
                © 2014

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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