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Co-management and the co-production of knowledge: Learning to adapt in Canada's Arctic

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      Adaptation, adaptive capacity and vulnerability

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        Adaptation to Environmental Change: Contributions of a Resilience Framework

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          Evolution of co-management: role of knowledge generation, bridging organizations and social learning.

           Fikret Berkes (2009)
          Over a period of some 20 years, different aspects of co-management (the sharing of power and responsibility between the government and local resource users) have come to the forefront. The paper focuses on a selection of these: knowledge generation, bridging organizations, social learning, and the emergence of adaptive co-management. Co-management can be considered a knowledge partnership. Different levels of organization, from local to international, have comparative advantages in the generation and mobilization of knowledge acquired at different scales. Bridging organizations provide a forum for the interaction of these different kinds of knowledge, and the coordination of other tasks that enable co-operation: accessing resources, bringing together different actors, building trust, resolving conflict, and networking. Social learning is one of these tasks, essential both for the co-operation of partners and an outcome of the co-operation of partners. It occurs most efficiently through joint problem solving and reflection within learning networks. Through successive rounds of learning and problem solving, learning networks can incorporate new knowledge to deal with problems at increasingly larger scales, with the result that maturing co-management arrangements become adaptive co-management in time.
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            Journal
            Global Environmental Change
            Global Environmental Change
            Elsevier BV
            09593780
            August 2011
            August 2011
            : 21
            : 3
            : 995-1004
            10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2011.04.006
            © 2011

            http://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

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