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      Expression of Fos-like immunoreactivity in the brain of quail chick emitting the isolation-induced distress calls

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      Neuroscience Letters

      Elsevier BV

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          Most cited references 13

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          Expression of c-fos protein in brain: metabolic mapping at the cellular level.

          The proto-oncogene c-fos is expressed in neurons in response to direct stimulation by growth factors and neurotransmitters. In order to determine whether the c-fos protein (Fos) and Fos-related proteins can be induced in response to polysynaptic activation, rat hindlimb motor/sensory cortex was stimulated electrically and Fos expression examined immunohistochemically. Three hours after the onset of stimulation, focal nuclear Fos staining was seen in motor and sensory thalamus, pontine nuclei, globus pallidus, and cerebellum. Moreover, 24-hour water deprivation resulted in Fos expression in paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei. Fos immunohistochemistry therefore provides a cellular method to label polysynaptically activated neurons and thereby map functional pathways.
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            Vocalizations Elicited By Electrical Brain Stimulation in Coturnix Coturnix Japonica

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              How chicks make memories: the cellular cascade from c-fos to dendritic remodelling.

              Training chicks on a one-trial passive avoidance task results in a cellular cascade over the subsequent hours. Phosphorylation of the presynaptic phosphokinase C substrate B-50 is followed by immediate-early gene expression and increased synthesis of pre- and postsynaptic glycoproteins, increases in dendritic spine densities, synapse and synaptic vesicle numbers, and a prolonged increase in neuronal bursting. Many of these effects have been localized to two forebrain regions: the left intermediate medial hyperstriatum ventrale and the lobus parolfactorius. Pretraining lesions in the left intermediate medial hyperstriatum ventrale, or post-training lesions in the lobus parolfactorius result in amnesia. These and related results lead to models of memory storage based on multiple representation by way of synaptic stabilization through glycoprotein synaptic recognition molecules.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Neuroscience Letters
                Neuroscience Letters
                Elsevier BV
                03043940
                December 1996
                December 1996
                : 220
                : 3
                : 191-194
                Article
                10.1016/S0304-3940(96)13256-0
                8994225
                © 1996

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