Blog
About

8
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      The spatial patterns of plaques and tangles in Alzheimer's disease do not support the 'cascade hypothesis'.

      Dementia (Basel, Switzerland)

      Aged, Alzheimer Disease, pathology, Amyloid beta-Peptides, metabolism, Brain, Cerebral Cortex, Humans, Intermediate Filaments, Middle Aged, Neurofibrillary Tangles, Silver Staining

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          In Alzheimer's disease (AD), the 'Cascade hypothesis' proposes that the formation of paired helical filaments (PHF) may be casually linked to the deposition of beta/A4 protein. Hence, there should be a close spatial relationship between senile plaques and cellular neurofibrillary tangles in a local region of the brain. In tissue from 6 AD patients, plaques and tangles occurred in clusters and individual clusters were often regularly spaced along the cortical strip. However, the clusters of plaques and tangles were in phase in only 4/32 cortical tissues examined. Hence, the data were not consistent with the 'Cascade hypothesis' that beta/A4 and PHF are directly linked in AD.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          8358502

          Comments

          Comment on this article