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      Ischemic steal syndrome following arm arteriovenous fistula for hemodialysis.

      Vascular medicine (London, England)

      Vascular Patency, blood supply, Upper Extremity, Treatment Outcome, radiography, physiopathology, Subclavian Artery, Stents, Renal Dialysis, Regional Blood Flow, Male, therapy, etiology, Ischemia, Humans, Hemodynamics, adverse effects, Arteriovenous Shunt, Surgical, Arterial Occlusive Diseases, instrumentation, Angioplasty, Balloon, Aged, 80 and over

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          Abstract

          Arteriovenous fistulae in the arm are commonly used for hemodialysis in end-stage renal disease. Although physiological steal with reverse flow in the artery distal to the fistula is common, hand ischemia or infarction are rare. The ischemic steal syndrome (hand or forearm ischemia) is usually a result of arterial disease proximal or distal to the fistula and/or poor collateral supply to the hand. The diagnosis is primarily clinical; however, markedly reduced digital pressures and pulse volume recordings support the diagnosis. Management requires imaging for focal stenoses or disease in arteries proximal and distal to the fistula from the aorta to the hand. We present a case caused by subclavian artery occlusion that was initially missed due to focusing investigation only on the fistula. We describe the percutaneous treatments and surgical revisions that attempt to restore flow to the hand without compromising the fistula.

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          Journal
          10.1177/1358863X09102293
          19808723

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