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      JOINING ANDAVOIDANCEBEHAVIOR INNONSOCIALINSECTS

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      Annual Review of Entomology
      Annual Reviews

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          Abstract

          Groups of two or more consexual conspecific adults of many kinds of nonsocial insects have been observed to form at feeding, mating, ovipositional, or sheltering sites. Conversely, adults of these same insects have been observed to avoid joining consexual conspecifics (or their progeny) and to place themselves (or their progeny) at some distance that results in spacing. Examples from various taxa illustrate that mechanisms underlying joining or avoidance behavior differ among species, as do types of benefits and costs to individuals who decide to join or avoid others. Moreover, within a given species, the decision to join or avoid others can be affected markedly by the physiological and informational state of the individual and by contextual response thresholds to resource availability. Decisions that benefit the individual may or may not affect the group in terms of total reproductive output.

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          Visualization of an Oxygen-deficient Bottom Water Circulation in Osaka Bay, Japan

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            Consequences of the Allee effect for behaviour, ecology and conservation.

            Warder C. Allee brought attention to the possibility of a positive relationship between aspects of fitness and population size 50 years ago. Until recently, however, this concept was generally regarded as an intriguing but relatively unimportant aspect of population ecology. Increasing appreciation that Allee effects must be incorporated into models of population dynamics and habitat use, together with recent interest in the implications of sociality for conservation, have shown that for ecology and conservation the consequences of the Allee effect are profound. The Allee effect can be regarded not only as a suite of problems associated with rarity, but also as the basis of animal sociality.
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              Exploitation of Sexual Signals by Predators and Parasitoids

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Annual Review of Entomology
                Annu. Rev. Entomol.
                Annual Reviews
                0066-4170
                1545-4487
                January 2001
                January 2001
                : 46
                : 1
                : 631-665
                Article
                10.1146/annurev.ento.46.1.631
                11112182
                46773aa7-c392-412c-8af5-c01e653fe157
                © 2001
                History

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