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No Significant Reduction of Circulating Endothelial-Derived and Platelet-Derived Microparticles in Patients with Psoriasis Successfully Treated with Anti-IL12/23

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BioMed Research International

Hindawi Publishing Corporation

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      Abstract

      Psoriasis is associated with atherosclerosis, in which circulating microparticles play an important role. In severe psoriasis, there was an increase of endothelial- and platelet- microparticles which could be decreased by anti-TNF α. However, whether anti-IL-12/23 treatment would decrease the level of microparticles remains unknown. Our study showed that, despite the clinical improvement of psoriasis after IL-12/13 blockage, the increased levels of circulating CD41a and CD31 microparticles were unchanged after anti-IL-12/23. This result suggested that anti-IL12/23 treatment may not alter the development of cardiovascular disease in patients with psoriasis.

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      Most cited references 24

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      The metabolic syndrome and total and cardiovascular disease mortality in middle-aged men.

      The metabolic syndrome, a concurrence of disturbed glucose and insulin metabolism, overweight and abdominal fat distribution, mild dyslipidemia, and hypertension, is associated with subsequent development of type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Despite its high prevalence, little is known of the prospective association of the metabolic syndrome with cardiovascular and overall mortality. To assess the association of the metabolic syndrome with cardiovascular and overall mortality using recently proposed definitions and factor analysis. The Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study, a population-based, prospective cohort study of 1209 Finnish men aged 42 to 60 years at baseline (1984-1989) who were initially without CVD, cancer, or diabetes. Follow-up continued through December 1998. Death due to coronary heart disease (CHD), CVD, and any cause among men with vs without the metabolic syndrome, using 4 definitions based on the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) and the World Health Organization (WHO). The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome ranged from 8.8% to 14.3%, depending on the definition. There were 109 deaths during the approximately 11.4-year follow-up, of which 46 and 27 were due to CVD and CHD, respectively. Men with the metabolic syndrome as defined by the NCEP were 2.9 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-7.2) to 4.2 (95% CI, 1.6-10.8) times more likely and, as defined by the WHO, 2.9 (95% CI, 1.2-6.8) to 3.3 (95% CI, 1.4-7.7) times more likely to die of CHD after adjustment for conventional cardiovascular risk factors. The metabolic syndrome as defined by the WHO was associated with 2.6 (95% CI, 1.4-5.1) to 3.0 (95% CI, 1.5-5.7) times higher CVD mortality and 1.9 (95% CI, 1.2-3.0) to 2.1 (95% CI, 1.3-3.3) times higher all-cause mortality. The NCEP definition less consistently predicted CVD and all-cause mortality. Factor analysis using 13 variables associated with metabolic or cardiovascular risk yielded a metabolic syndrome factor that explained 18% of total variance. Men with loadings on the metabolic factor in the highest quarter were 3.6 (95% CI, 1.7-7.9), 3.2 (95% CI, 1.7-5.8), and 2.3 (95% CI, 1.5-3.4) times more likely to die of CHD, CVD, and any cause, respectively. Cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality are increased in men with the metabolic syndrome, even in the absence of baseline CVD and diabetes. Early identification, treatment, and prevention of the metabolic syndrome present a major challenge for health care professionals facing an epidemic of overweight and sedentary lifestyle.
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        The metabolic syndrome and total and cardiovascular disease mortality in middle-aged men

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          PECAM-1 is required for transendothelial migration of leukocytes

          Platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1; CD31) is crucial to the process of leukocyte transmigration through intercellular junctions of vascular endothelial cells. A monoclonal antibody to PECAM, or recombinant soluble PECAM, blocks transendothelial migration of monocytes by 70-90%. Pretreating either the monocytes or the endothelial junctions with antibody blocks transmigration. If the endothelium is first activated by cytokines, anti-PECAM antibody or soluble recombinant PECAM again block transmigration of both monocytes and neutrophils. Anti-PECAM does not block chemotaxis of either cell type. Light and electron microscopy reveal that leukocytes blocked in transmigration remain tightly bound to the apical surface of the endothelial cell, precisely over the intercellular junction. Thus, the process of leukocyte emigration can be dissected into three successive stages: rolling, mediated by the selectin class of adhesion molecules; tight adhesion, mediated by the leukocyte integrins and their endothelial cell counter-receptors; and now transmigration, which, based on these studies, requires PECAM-1.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            Department of Dermatology, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Ta-Pei Road 123, Niao-Sung, Kaohsiung 83301, Taiwan
            Author notes

            Academic Editor: Enrico Compalati

            Journal
            Biomed Res Int
            Biomed Res Int
            BMRI
            BioMed Research International
            Hindawi Publishing Corporation
            2314-6133
            2314-6141
            2016
            10 April 2016
            : 2016
            27144162 4842038 10.1155/2016/3242143
            Copyright © 2016 Ji-Chen Ho et al.

            This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

            Categories
            Clinical Study

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