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      The allure of a mean friend: Relationship quality and processes of aggressive adolescents with prosocial skills

      , ,
      International Journal of Behavioral Development
      SAGE Publications

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          The company they keep: friendships and their developmental significance.

          Considerable evidence tells us that ¿being liked¿ and ¿being disliked¿ are related to social competence, but evidence concerning friendships and their developmental significance is relatively weak. The argument is advanced that the developmental implications of these relationships cannot be specified without distinguishing between having friends, the identity of one's friends, and friendship quality. Most commonly, children are differentiated from one another in diagnosis and research only according to whether or not they have friends. The evidence shows that friends provide one another with cognitive and social scaffolding that differs from what nonfriends provide, and having friends supports good outcomes across normative transitions. But predicting developmental outcome also requires knowing about the behavioral characteristics and attitudes of children's friends as well as qualitative features of these relationships.
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            Gender and relationships. A developmental account.

            E Maccoby (1990)
            This article argues that behavioral differentiation of the sexes is minimal when children are observed or tested individually. Sex differences emerge primarily in social situations, and their nature varies with the gender composition of dyads and groups. Children find same-sex play partners more compatible, and they segregate themselves into same-sex groups, in which distinctive interaction styles emerge. These styles are described. As children move into adolescence, the patterns they developed in their childhood same-sex groups are carried over into cross-sex encounters in which girls' styles put them at a disadvantage. Patterns of mutual influence can become more symmetrical in intimate male-female dyads, but the distinctive styles of the two sexes can still be seen in such dyads and are subsequently manifested in the roles and relationships of parenthood. The implications of these continuities are considered.
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              The Ontogenesis of Social Dominance: A Strategy-Based Evolutionary Perspective

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                International Journal of Behavioral Development
                International Journal of Behavioral Development
                SAGE Publications
                0165-0254
                1464-0651
                June 30 2016
                June 30 2016
                : 31
                : 2
                : 170-180
                Article
                10.1177/0165025407074630
                46fabbd1-9261-418b-9471-1503355e4ae4
                © 2016
                History

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