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      The pulse of the city through Twitter: relationships between land use and spatiotemporal demographics

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          Abstract

          Social network data offer interesting opportunities in urban studies. In this study, we used Twitter data to analyse city dynamics over the course of the day. Users of this social network were grouped according to city zone and time slot in order to analyse the daily dynamics of the city and the relationship between this and land use. First, daytime activity in each zone was compared with activity at night in order to determine which zones showed increased activity in each of the time slots. Then, typical Twitter activity profiles were obtained based on the predominant land use in each zone, indicating how land uses linked to activities were activated during the day, but at different rates depending on the type of land use. Lastly, a multiple regression analysis was performed to determine the influence of the different land uses on each of the major time slots (morning, afternoon, evening and night) through their changing coefficients. Activity tended to decrease throughout the day for most land uses (e.g. offices, education, health and transport), but remained constant in parks and increased in retail and residential zones. Our results show that social network data can be used to improve our understanding of the link between land use and urban dynamics.

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          The Twitter of Babel: Mapping World Languages through Microblogging Platforms

          Large scale analysis and statistics of socio-technical systems that just a few short years ago would have required the use of consistent economic and human resources can nowadays be conveniently performed by mining the enormous amount of digital data produced by human activities. Although a characterization of several aspects of our societies is emerging from the data revolution, a number of questions concerning the reliability and the biases inherent to the big data “proxies” of social life are still open. Here, we survey worldwide linguistic indicators and trends through the analysis of a large-scale dataset of microblogging posts. We show that available data allow for the study of language geography at scales ranging from country-level aggregation to specific city neighborhoods. The high resolution and coverage of the data allows us to investigate different indicators such as the linguistic homogeneity of different countries, the touristic seasonal patterns within countries and the geographical distribution of different languages in multilingual regions. This work highlights the potential of geolocalized studies of open data sources to improve current analysis and develop indicators for major social phenomena in specific communities.
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            The convergence of GIS and social media: challenges for GIScience

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              Cross-Checking Different Sources of Mobility Information

              The pervasive use of new mobile devices has allowed a better characterization in space and time of human concentrations and mobility in general. Besides its theoretical interest, describing mobility is of great importance for a number of practical applications ranging from the forecast of disease spreading to the design of new spaces in urban environments. While classical data sources, such as surveys or census, have a limited level of geographical resolution (e.g., districts, municipalities, counties are typically used) or are restricted to generic workdays or weekends, the data coming from mobile devices can be precisely located both in time and space. Most previous works have used a single data source to study human mobility patterns. Here we perform instead a cross-check analysis by comparing results obtained with data collected from three different sources: Twitter, census, and cell phones. The analysis is focused on the urban areas of Barcelona and Madrid, for which data of the three types is available. We assess the correlation between the datasets on different aspects: the spatial distribution of people concentration, the temporal evolution of people density, and the mobility patterns of individuals. Our results show that the three data sources are providing comparable information. Even though the representativeness of Twitter geolocated data is lower than that of mobile phone and census data, the correlations between the population density profiles and mobility patterns detected by the three datasets are close to one in a grid with cells of 2×2 and 1×1 square kilometers. This level of correlation supports the feasibility of interchanging the three data sources at the spatio-temporal scales considered.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                2017-05-22
                1705.07956

                http://arxiv.org/licenses/nonexclusive-distrib/1.0/

                Custom metadata
                15 pages, 6 figures
                cs.CY

                Applied computer science

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