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UniProt: the universal protein knowledgebase

The UniProt Consortium 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , *

Nucleic Acids Research

Oxford University Press

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      Abstract

      The UniProt knowledgebase is a large resource of protein sequences and associated detailed annotation. The database contains over 60 million sequences, of which over half a million sequences have been curated by experts who critically review experimental and predicted data for each protein. The remainder are automatically annotated based on rule systems that rely on the expert curated knowledge. Since our last update in 2014, we have more than doubled the number of reference proteomes to 5631, giving a greater coverage of taxonomic diversity. We implemented a pipeline to remove redundant highly similar proteomes that were causing excessive redundancy in UniProt. The initial run of this pipeline reduced the number of sequences in UniProt by 47 million. For our users interested in the accessory proteomes, we have made available sets of pan proteome sequences that cover the diversity of sequences for each species that is found in its strains and sub-strains. To help interpretation of genomic variants, we provide tracks of detailed protein information for the major genome browsers. We provide a SPARQL endpoint that allows complex queries of the more than 22 billion triples of data in UniProt ( http://sparql.uniprot.org/). UniProt resources can be accessed via the website at http://www.uniprot.org/.

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      Most cited references 29

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      Standards and Guidelines for the Interpretation of Sequence Variants: A Joint Consensus Recommendation of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics and the Association for Molecular Pathology

      The American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) previously developed guidance for the interpretation of sequence variants. 1 In the past decade, sequencing technology has evolved rapidly with the advent of high-throughput next generation sequencing. By adopting and leveraging next generation sequencing, clinical laboratories are now performing an ever increasing catalogue of genetic testing spanning genotyping, single genes, gene panels, exomes, genomes, transcriptomes and epigenetic assays for genetic disorders. By virtue of increased complexity, this paradigm shift in genetic testing has been accompanied by new challenges in sequence interpretation. In this context, the ACMG convened a workgroup in 2013 comprised of representatives from the ACMG, the Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP) and the College of American Pathologists (CAP) to revisit and revise the standards and guidelines for the interpretation of sequence variants. The group consisted of clinical laboratory directors and clinicians. This report represents expert opinion of the workgroup with input from ACMG, AMP and CAP stakeholders. These recommendations primarily apply to the breadth of genetic tests used in clinical laboratories including genotyping, single genes, panels, exomes and genomes. This report recommends the use of specific standard terminology: ‘pathogenic’, ‘likely pathogenic’, ‘uncertain significance’, ‘likely benign’, and ‘benign’ to describe variants identified in Mendelian disorders. Moreover, this recommendation describes a process for classification of variants into these five categories based on criteria using typical types of variant evidence (e.g. population data, computational data, functional data, segregation data, etc.). Because of the increased complexity of analysis and interpretation of clinical genetic testing described in this report, the ACMG strongly recommends that clinical molecular genetic testing should be performed in a CLIA-approved laboratory with results interpreted by a board-certified clinical molecular geneticist or molecular genetic pathologist or equivalent.
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        UniProt: a hub for protein information

        UniProt is an important collection of protein sequences and their annotations, which has doubled in size to 80 million sequences during the past year. This growth in sequences has prompted an extension of UniProt accession number space from 6 to 10 characters. An increasing fraction of new sequences are identical to a sequence that already exists in the database with the majority of sequences coming from genome sequencing projects. We have created a new proteome identifier that uniquely identifies a particular assembly of a species and strain or subspecies to help users track the provenance of sequences. We present a new website that has been designed using a user-experience design process. We have introduced an annotation score for all entries in UniProt to represent the relative amount of knowledge known about each protein. These scores will be helpful in identifying which proteins are the best characterized and most informative for comparative analysis. All UniProt data is provided freely and is available on the web at http://www.uniprot.org/.
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          2016 update of the PRIDE database and its related tools

          The PRoteomics IDEntifications (PRIDE) database is one of the world-leading data repositories of mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics data. Since the beginning of 2014, PRIDE Archive (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/) is the new PRIDE archival system, replacing the original PRIDE database. Here we summarize the developments in PRIDE resources and related tools since the previous update manuscript in the Database Issue in 2013. PRIDE Archive constitutes a complete redevelopment of the original PRIDE, comprising a new storage backend, data submission system and web interface, among other components. PRIDE Archive supports the most-widely used PSI (Proteomics Standards Initiative) data standard formats (mzML and mzIdentML) and implements the data requirements and guidelines of the ProteomeXchange Consortium. The wide adoption of ProteomeXchange within the community has triggered an unprecedented increase in the number of submitted data sets (around 150 data sets per month). We outline some statistics on the current PRIDE Archive data contents. We also report on the status of the PRIDE related stand-alone tools: PRIDE Inspector, PRIDE Converter 2 and the ProteomeXchange submission tool. Finally, we will give a brief update on the resources under development ‘PRIDE Cluster’ and ‘PRIDE Proteomes’, which provide a complementary view and quality-scored information of the peptide and protein identification data available in PRIDE Archive.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [1 ]European Molecular Biology Laboratory, European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI), Wellcome Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SD, UK
            [2 ]SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, Centre Medical Universitaire, 1 rue Michel Servet, 1211 Geneva 4, Switzerland
            [3 ]Protein Information Resource, Georgetown University Medical Center, 3300 Whitehaven Street NW, Suite 1200, WA 20007, USA
            [4 ]Protein Information Resource, University of Delaware, 15 Innovation Way, Suite 205, Newark DE 19711, USA
            Author notes
            [* ]To whom correspondence should be addressed. Tel: +44 1223 494 100; Fax: +44 1223 494 468; Email: agb@ 123456ebi.ac.uk
            Journal
            Nucleic Acids Res
            Nucleic Acids Res
            nar
            nar
            Nucleic Acids Research
            Oxford University Press
            0305-1048
            1362-4962
            04 January 2017
            28 November 2016
            28 November 2016
            : 45
            : Database issue , Database issue
            : D158-D169
            27899622 5210571 10.1093/nar/gkw1099
            © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

            This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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            Pages: 12
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            04 January 2017

            Genetics

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