12
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Self-Assembly of Colloidal Nanocrystals: From Intricate Structures to Functional Materials.

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Chemical methods developed over the past two decades enable preparation of colloidal nanocrystals with uniform size and shape. These Brownian objects readily order into superlattices. Recently, the range of accessible inorganic cores and tunable surface chemistries dramatically increased, expanding the set of nanocrystal arrangements experimentally attainable. In this review, we discuss efforts to create next-generation materials via bottom-up organization of nanocrystals with preprogrammed functionality and self-assembly instructions. This process is often driven by both interparticle interactions and the influence of the assembly environment. The introduction provides the reader with a practical overview of nanocrystal synthesis, self-assembly, and superlattice characterization. We then summarize the theory of nanocrystal interactions and examine fundamental principles governing nanocrystal self-assembly from hard and soft particle perspectives borrowed from the comparatively established fields of micrometer colloids and block copolymer assembly. We outline the extensive catalog of superlattices prepared to date using hydrocarbon-capped nanocrystals with spherical, polyhedral, rod, plate, and branched inorganic core shapes, as well as those obtained by mixing combinations thereof. We also provide an overview of structural defects in nanocrystal superlattices. We then explore the unique possibilities offered by leveraging nontraditional surface chemistries and assembly environments to control superlattice structure and produce nonbulk assemblies. We end with a discussion of the unique optical, magnetic, electronic, and catalytic properties of ordered nanocrystal superlattices, and the coming advances required to make use of this new class of solids.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          Chem. Rev.
          Chemical reviews
          American Chemical Society (ACS)
          1520-6890
          0009-2665
          Sep 28 2016
          : 116
          : 18
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Chemistry and James Franck Institute, University of Chicago , Chicago, Illinois 60637, United States.
          [2 ] Institute for Multiscale Simulation, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg , 91052 Erlangen, Germany.
          [3 ] Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan , Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, United States.
          [4 ] Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Lab , Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States.
          Article
          10.1021/acs.chemrev.6b00196
          27552640
          47badf19-8dba-44c5-a9fd-100fa7058b0a
          History

          Comments

          Comment on this article