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      COMPARATIVE STUDY OF GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS FROM HAND TUNNELING AND PILOT TUBE METHOD UNDERGROUND CONSTRUCTION METHODS

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          Abstract

          The negative effects of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, such as climate change and global warming, have become major environmental concerns, especially for the construction industry, which is the third-highest source of GHG emissions among industrialized countries. Presently, underground utility projects are considered one of the most common types of construction, primarily due to aging infrastructure across North America and the subsequent rehabilitation of old pipelines and installation of new pipelines and facilities. Given the increasing demand being placed on the industry, the need to study airborne emissions associated with different underground construction technologies has risen, which will be helpful in selecting the most sustainable underground construction methods. This study investigates pollutant emission from two common trenchless methods used in underground construction, hand tunneling and pilot-tube method (PTM), through their varying GHG footprint sources and emissions measured by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This paper analyzes a case from Edmonton, Canada, in which both PTM and hand tunneling were used by comparing the suggested indexes, including HC, CO, NO x, PM, CO 2, and SO 2. In this case study, both methods were used in the installation of a new 68-cm diameter (27 in.) clay sewer line with an overburden depth of 12.9 m (42 ft) and length of 60 m (197 ft). Results indicated that the amount of airborne emissions was reduced between 17% and 36% through the use of PTM compared to the traditional hand tunnelling method.

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          Most cited references 11

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          Special purpose simulation templates for tunnel construction operations

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            COMPARISON OF EMITTED EMISSIONS BETWEEN TRENCHLESS PIPE REPLACEMENT AND OPEN CUT UTILITY CONSTRUCTION

            Currently, there is a worldwide trend towards reducing emissions into the environment generated by human activities. Pollutant emissions into the atmosphere are a major measure of the impact on environment. The construction industry is a major producer of such emissions due in part to the magnitude of operations and the vast array of equipment. Increased urbanization has resulted in a need for the installation of an expanded underground network of infrastructure that includes gas, water, wastewater, pipelines, power, and communications systems. Today, engineers are faced with engaging the construction option that not only provides the best cost advantage, but also considers environmental sensitivities to create the most sustainable solution. Reduction of pollutants such as carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxide (NO X ), total organic compounds (TOC), and sulfur oxide (SO X ) have been identified by the United States Environmental Protection Agency as critical to sustainable development. This paper describes an approach for quantifying airborne emissions that is demonstrated through a comparison of two construction methods for installing a wastewater line. It was discovered that the option involving a traditional open cut method resulted in an overall average of about 80% greater emissions compared to trenchless pipe replacement. The findings of this paper should assist the utility construction industry in technology selection to minimize environmental impacts.
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              Carbon Reduction and the Trenchless Industry

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                jgrb
                Journal of Green Building
                College Publishing
                1552-6100
                1943-4618
                1943-4618
                Fall 2017
                : 12
                : 4
                : 54-69
                Author notes

                1. MEng Student, University of Alberta

                2. MSc Student, University of Alberta

                3. Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Alberta

                4. Associate Professor, University of Alberta, Innovation Centre for Engineering, abayat@ 123456ualberta.ca (corresponding author)

                Article
                jgb.12.4.54
                10.3992/1943-4618.12.4.54
                © 2017 College Publishing
                Page count
                Pages: 16
                Product
                Categories
                RESEARCH ARTICLES

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