Blog
About

0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      Continuous Flow Peritoneal Dialysis: Clinical Applications

      Blood Purification

      S. Karger AG

      Biocompatibility, Continuous flow peritoneal dialysis, Peritoneal dialysis, Adequacy

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Continuous flow peritoneal dialysis (CFPD) can be considered a special form of hemodialysis, during which peritoneal effluent, rather than blood, is being dialyzed using standard hemodialysis technology. Preliminary clinical data have identified poor mixing of the dialysis solution, streaming and recirculation as a significant limitation in achieving maximal solute removal and ultrafiltration. Better catheter designs remain a research priority in this field. Although the clinical experience is limited to short-lasting experiments with CFPD, the preliminary data strongly support the superiority of CFPD as the most effective peritoneal dialysis modality in removing small solutes and providing high ultrafiltration rates. The levels of clearance attained are similar to quotidian hemodialysis. In addition, it is expected that the current methodology will provide a new standard of solution biocompatibility.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 3

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Importance of dialysis adequacy in mortality and morbidity of chinese CAPD patients.

          In continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), the impact of dialysis adequacy on patient outcome is well established in Caucasian patients but is less clear in Asian patients. Recent evidence suggests that Asian dialysis patients enjoy better overall survival. We hypothesize that dialysis adequacy may be less important in determining outcome for this ethnic group. We performed a single-center prospective observational study. From September 1995, we enrolled 150 existing and 120 new CAPD patients. They were followed for up to three years. We monitored dialysis adequacy and nutritional indices, including Kt/V, weekly creatinine clearance (CCr), residual glomerular filtration rate (GFR), normalized protein catabolic rate (NPCR), percentage of lean body mass (%LBM), and plasma albumin level. Clinical outcomes included mortality, technique failure, and duration of hospitalization. The duration of study follow-up was 22.1 +/- 12.3 months. In our study population, 136 were male. Seventy were diabetic (25.9%), and 212 were treated with 6 L exchanges per day (78.5%). The body weight was 59.3 +/- 9.4 kg. Baseline total Kt/V was 1.78 +/- 0.41, peritoneal Kt/V 1.48 +/- 0.36, and median residual GFR 0.98 mL/min (range 0 to 7.45). Two-year patient survival was 83.0%, and technique survival was 72.8%. Multivariate analysis showed that the duration of dialysis, diabetes, %LBM, index of dialysis adequacy (Kt/V or CCr), residual GFR, and requirement of a helper for CAPD exchanges were independent factors of patient survival; serum albumin, adequacy index (Kt/V or CCr), and requirement of a helper were independent factors of technique survival. Duration of dialysis, body weight, requirement of helper, cardiovascular disease, HBsAg carrier, serum albumin, and CCr had independent effects on hospitalization. The peritoneal component of Kt/V or CCr had no independent effect on any outcome parameter. When the prevalent and new CAPD cases were analyzed separately, Kt/V predicted survival only for new CAPD cases. Our results show that dialysis adequacy has significant impact on outcome of Asian CAPD patients. Although we have excellent medium-term patient and technique survival, this favorable outcome should not prevent health care workers from providing adequate dialysis to Asian patients. The reason of discrepancy in outcome between Asian and Caucasian dialysis patients requires further study.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: found

            Continuous-Flow Peritoneal Dialysis

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Automated Peritoneal Dialysis

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                BPU
                Blood Purif
                10.1159/issn.0253-5068
                Blood Purification
                S. Karger AG
                978-3-8055-7372-6
                978-3-318-00813-5
                0253-5068
                1421-9735
                2002
                2002
                17 January 2002
                : 20
                : 1
                : 36-39
                Affiliations
                Fresenius Medical Care-North America, Charlotte, N.C., USA
                Article
                46983 Blood Purif 2002;20:36–39
                10.1159/000046983
                11803157
                © 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Figures: 1, References: 23, Pages: 4
                Product
                Self URI (application/pdf): https://www.karger.com/Article/Pdf/46983
                Categories
                Paper

                Comments

                Comment on this article