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      What’s New in Adaptive Management and Restoration of Coasts and Estuaries?

      Estuaries and Coasts

      Springer Nature

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          REDISCOVERY OF TRADITIONAL ECOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE AS ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT

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            Enhancement of biodiversity and ecosystem services by ecological restoration: a meta-analysis.

            Ecological restoration is widely used to reverse the environmental degradation caused by human activities. However, the effectiveness of restoration actions in increasing provision of both biodiversity and ecosystem services has not been evaluated systematically. A meta-analysis of 89 restoration assessments in a wide range of ecosystem types across the globe indicates that ecological restoration increased provision of biodiversity and ecosystem services by 44 and 25%, respectively. However, values of both remained lower in restored versus intact reference ecosystems. Increases in biodiversity and ecosystem service measures after restoration were positively correlated. Results indicate that restoration actions focused on enhancing biodiversity should support increased provision of ecosystem services, particularly in tropical terrestrial biomes.
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              Tidal wetland stability in the face of human impacts and sea-level rise.

              Coastal populations and wetlands have been intertwined for centuries, whereby humans both influence and depend on the extensive ecosystem services that wetlands provide. Although coastal wetlands have long been considered vulnerable to sea-level rise, recent work has identified fascinating feedbacks between plant growth and geomorphology that allow wetlands to actively resist the deleterious effects of sea-level rise. Humans alter the strength of these feedbacks by changing the climate, nutrient inputs, sediment delivery and subsidence rates. Whether wetlands continue to survive sea-level rise depends largely on how human impacts interact with rapid sea-level rise, and socio-economic factors that influence transgression into adjacent uplands.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Estuaries and Coasts
                Estuaries and Coasts
                Springer Nature
                1559-2723
                1559-2731
                January 2017
                September 19 2016
                : 40
                : 1
                : 1-21
                Article
                10.1007/s12237-016-0162-5
                © 2016

                http://www.springer.com/tdm

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