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      Weight loss reduces knee-joint loads in overweight and obese older adults with knee osteoarthritis

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      Arthritis & Rheumatism

      Wiley

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          Abstract

          To determine the relationship between change in body mass and knee-joint moments and forces during walking in overweight and obese older adults with knee osteoarthritis (OA) following an 18-month clinical trial of diet and exercise. Data were obtained from 142 sedentary, overweight, and obese older adults with self-reported disability and radiographic evidence of knee OA who underwent 3-dimensional gait analysis. Gait kinetic outcome variables included peak knee-joint forces and peak internal knee-joint moments. Mixed regression models were created to predict followup kinetic values, using followup body mass as the primary explanatory variable. Baseline body mass was used as a covariate, and thus followup body mass was a surrogate measure for change in body mass (i.e., weight loss). There was a significant direct association between followup body mass and peak followup values of compressive force (P = 0.001), resultant force (P = 0.002), abduction moment (P = 0.03), and medial rotation moment (P = 0.02). A weight reduction of 9.8 N (1 kg) was associated with reductions of 40.6 N and 38.7 N in compressive and resultant forces, respectively. Thus, each weight-loss unit was associated with an approximately 4-unit reduction in knee-joint forces. In addition, a reduction in body weight of 9.8 N (1 kg) was associated with a 1.4% reduction (0.496 Nm) in knee abduction moment. Our results indicate that each pound of weight lost will result in a 4-fold reduction in the load exerted on the knee per step during daily activities. Accumulated over thousands of steps per day, a reduction of this magnitude would appear to be clinically meaningful.

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          Most cited references 26

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          Recommendations for the medical management of osteoarthritis of the hip and knee: 2000 update. American College of Rheumatology Subcommittee on Osteoarthritis Guidelines.

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            Risk factors for the incidence and progression of radiographic knee osteoarthritis.

            Preventive strategies against knee osteoarthritis (OA) require a knowledge of risk factors that influence the initiation of the disorder and its subsequent progression. This population-based longitudinal study was performed to address this issue. Ninety-nine men and 255 women aged > or =55 years had baseline interviews and weight-bearing knee radiographs in 1990-1991. Repeat radiographs were obtained in 1995-1996 (mean followup duration 5.1 years, median age at followup 75.8 years). Risk factors assessed at baseline were tested for their association with incident and progressive radiographic knee OA by logistic regression. Rates of incidence and progression were 2.5% and 3.6% per year, respectively. After adjusting for age and sex, the risk of incident radiographic knee OA was significantly increased among subjects with higher baseline body mass index (odds ratio [OR] 18.3, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 5.1-65.1, highest versus lowest third), previous knee injury (OR 4.8, 95% CI 1.0-24.1), and a history of regular sports participation (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.1-9.1). Knee pain at baseline (OR 2.4, 95% CI 0.7-8.0) and Heberden's nodes (OR 2.0, 95% CI 0.7-5.7) were weakly associated with progression. Analyses based on individual radiographic features (osteophyte formation and joint space narrowing) supported differences in risk factors for either feature. Most currently recognized risk factors for prevalent knee OA (obesity, knee injury, and physical activity) influence incidence more than radiographic progression. Furthermore, these factors might selectively influence osteophyte formation more than joint space narrowing. These findings are consistent with knee OA being initiated by joint injury, but with progression being a consequence of impaired intrinsic repair capacity.
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              EULAR recommendations for the management of knee osteoarthritis: report of a task force of the Standing Committee for International Clinical Studies Including Therapeutic Trials (ESCISIT).

              Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease encountered throughout Europe. A task force for the EULAR Standing Committee for Clinical Trials met in 1998 to determine the methodological and logistical approach required for the development of evidence based guidelines for treatment of knee OA. The guidelines were restricted to cover all currently available treatments for knee OA diagnosed either clinically and/or radiographically affecting any compartment of the knee. The first stage was the selection of treatment modalities to be considered. The second stage comprised a search of the electronic databases Medline and Embase using a combination of subject headings and keywords. All European language publications in the form of systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomised controlled trials, controlled trials, and observational studies were included. During stage three all the relevant studies were quality scored. The summary statistics for validated outcome measures, when available, were recorded and, where practical, the numbers needed to treat and the effect size for each treatment were calculated. In the fourth stage key clinical propositions were determined by expert consensus employing a Delphi approach. The final stage ranked these propositions according to the available evidence. A second set of propositions relating to a future research agenda was determined by expert consensus using a Delphi approach. Over 2400 English language publications and 400 non-English language publications were identified. Seven hundred and forty four studies presented outcome data of the effects of specific treatments on knee OA. Quantitative analysis of treatment effect was possible in only 61 studies. Recommendations for the management of knee OA based on currently available data and expert opinion are presented. Proposals for a future research agenda are highlighted. These are the first clinical guidelines on knee OA to combine an evidence based approach and a consensus approach across a wide range of treatment modalities. It is apparent that certain clinical propositions are supported by substantial research based evidence, while others are not. There is thus an urgent need for future well designed trials to consider key clinical questions.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Arthritis & Rheumatism
                Arthritis Rheum
                Wiley
                0004-3591
                1529-0131
                July 2005
                July 2005
                2005
                : 52
                : 7
                : 2026-2032
                Article
                10.1002/art.21139
                15986358
                47eeabde-14e9-4526-ae9a-2b5350d3ee0b
                © 2005
                Product
                Self URI (article page): http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/art.21139

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