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      Childhood Maltreatment Exposure and Disruptions in Emotion Regulation: A Transdiagnostic Pathway to Adolescent Internalizing and Externalizing Psychopathology

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          Conceptualizing and testing random indirect effects and moderated mediation in multilevel models: new procedures and recommendations.

          The authors propose new procedures for evaluating direct, indirect, and total effects in multilevel models when all relevant variables are measured at Level 1 and all effects are random. Formulas are provided for the mean and variance of the indirect and total effects and for the sampling variances of the average indirect and total effects. Simulations show that the estimates are unbiased under most conditions. Confidence intervals based on a normal approximation or a simulated sampling distribution perform well when the random effects are normally distributed but less so when they are nonnormally distributed. These methods are further developed to address hypotheses of moderated mediation in the multilevel context. An example demonstrates the feasibility and usefulness of the proposed methods.
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            Coping with stress during childhood and adolescence: Problems, progress, and potential in theory and research.

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              Binge eating as escape from self-awareness.

              This article proposes that binge eating is motivated by a desire to escape from self-awareness. Binge eaters suffer from high standards and expectations, especially an acute sensitivity to the difficult (perceived) demands of others. When they fall short of these standards, they develop an aversive pattern of high self-awareness, characterized by unflattering views of self and concern over how they are perceived by others. These aversive self-perceptions are accompanied by emotional distress, which often includes anxiety and depression. To escape from this unpleasant state, binge eaters attempt the cognitive response of narrowing attention to the immediate stimulus environment and avoiding broadly meaningful thought. This narrowing of attention disengages normal inhibitions against eating and fosters an uncritical acceptance of irrational beliefs and thoughts. The escape model is capable of integrating much of the available evidence about binge eating.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Cognitive Therapy and Research
                Cogn Ther Res
                Springer Nature
                0147-5916
                1573-2819
                June 2016
                December 12 2015
                : 40
                : 3
                : 394-415
                Article
                10.1007/s10608-015-9735-z
                27695145
                47eebe56-ca2f-4f3d-80bc-0f55ab77e346
                © 2015

                http://www.springer.com/tdm

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