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Associations between dietary folate intake and risks of esophageal, gastric and pancreatic cancers: an overall and dose-response meta-analysis

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      Abstract

      There are still some controversies on the association between dietary folate intake and the risk of upper gastrointestinal cancers including esophageal, gastric and pancreatic cancers. Hence, a comprehensive meta-analysis on all available literatures was performed to clarify the relationship between dietary folate intake and risks of upper gastrointestinal cancers. An electric search was performed up to December 12th, 2016 within the PubMed, MEDLINE AND EMBASE databases. Ultimately, a total of 46 studies which evaluated the association between folate intake and risks of upper gastrointestinal cancers were included. According to the data from included studies, the pooled results showed significant association between folate intake and esophageal (OR = 0.545, 95%CI = 0.432-0.658), gastric (OR=0.762, 95%CI=0.648-0.876) and pancreatic (OR=0.731, 95%CI=0.555-0.907) cancers. Linearity dose-response analysis indicated that with 100μg/day increment in dietary folate intake, the risk of esophageal, gastric and pancreatic cancers would decrease by 9%, 1.5% and 6%, respectively. These findings indicated that higher level of dietary folate intake could help for preventing upper gastrointestinal cancers including esophageal, gastric and pancreatic cancers.

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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            1 Department of Pathology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430060, Hubei Province, P. R. China
            2 Department of Stomatology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, 430071, Hubei Province, P. R. China
            3 Department of Stomatology, Taikang Tongji Hospital, Wuhan, 430000, Hubei Province, P. R. China
            Author notes
            Correspondence to: Chaorong Tie, 414825917@ 123456qq.com
            [*]

            These authors have contributed equally to this work

            Journal
            Oncotarget
            Oncotarget
            Oncotarget
            ImpactJ
            Oncotarget
            Impact Journals LLC
            1949-2553
            17 October 2017
            28 June 2017
            : 8
            : 49
            : 86828-86842
            5689728
            18775
            10.18632/oncotarget.18775
            Copyright: © 2017 Liu et al.

            This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 3.0 (CC BY 3.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

            Categories
            Meta-Analysis

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