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      Feeding Behavior among Health-care Workers in a Tertiary Health Institution Southeast Nigeria

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          Abstract

          Background:

          Feeding behavior is an important factor in the prevention and management of noncommunicable diseases, which are the leading cause of death globally.

          Objective:

          This study is aimed to investigate the feeding behaviors among health-care workers in a tertiary hospital in southeast Nigeria.

          Materials and Methods:

          The study was a cross-sectional survey. A total of 418 participants (186 males and 232 females) were involved in the study. The instrument is a sociodemographic questionnaire and a modified form of the British Heart Foundation's questions to assess the nutritional value of individuals. The participants were consecutively recruited from their workstations. Data were collected using self-administered questionnaires, which were hand distributed and collected back on the same day after completion.

          Results:

          The study showed that health workers in the teaching hospital had an overall “fair” feeding behavior (86.13 ± 8.52 out of 140). It also showed that females had a significant ( P < 0.05) overall better feeding behavior (88.15 ± 9.00) compared to males (83.62 ± 7.18). The studied participants had poor feeding behavior in carbohydrates and fats and oil consumption and just fair behavior in fruits and vegetables, salt intake, and water consumption. The feeding behavior was inadequate, and there was no significant gender or profession-related differences in the overall behavior of the participants.

          Conclusion:

          The health-care workers in the tertiary health institution in southeast Nigeria have inadequate feeding behavior. They should join in the global call and awareness on healthy feeding behavior to prevent and reduce the burden of noncommunicable diseases.

          Résumé

          Contexte:

          Le comportement alimentaire est un facteur important dans la prévention et la gestion des maladies non transmissibles, qui sont les cause de décès dans le monde.

          Objectif:

          Cette étude vise à étudier les comportements alimentaires des agents de santé dans un hôpital tertiaire de au sud-est du Nigéria.

          Matériel et méthodes:

          L’étude était une enquête transversale. Un total de 418 participants (186 hommes et 232 femmes) ont été impliqués dans l’étude. L’instrument est un questionnaire sociodémographique et une forme modifiée des questions de la British Heart Foundation évaluer la valeur nutritionnelle des individus. Les participants ont été recrutés consécutivement à partir de leurs postes de travail. Les données ont été collectées en utilisant des questionnaires auto-administrés, qui ont été distribués à la main et récupérés le même jour après avoir été remplis.

          Résultats:

          l’étude a montré que les agents de santé de l’hôpital universitaire avaient globalement un comportement alimentaire «équitable» (86,13 ± 8,52 sur 140). Il a également montré que les femmes avaient un un meilleur comportement alimentaire global ( P <0,05) (88,15 ± 9,00) par rapport aux mâles (83,62 ± 7,18). Les participants étudiés avaient une mauvaise alimentation comportement dans les glucides et les graisses et la consommation d’huile et juste comportement équitable dans les fruits et légumes, la consommation de sel et la consommation d’eau. Le comportement alimentaire était inadéquat et il n’y avait pas de différences significatives liées au sexe ou à la profession dans le comportement général des participants.

          Conclusion:

          Les agents de santé de l’institution de santé tertiaire du sud-est du Nigéria ont un comportement alimentaire inadéquat. Ils devraient se joindre à l’appel mondial et à la sensibilisation sur les comportements alimentaires sains pour prévenir et réduire le fardeau des maladies non transmissibles.

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          Most cited references 24

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          Work, obesity, and occupational safety and health.

          There is increasing evidence that obesity and overweight may be related, in part, to adverse work conditions. In particular, the risk of obesity may increase in high-demand, low-control work environments, and for those who work long hours. In addition, obesity may modify the risk for vibration-induced injury and certain occupational musculoskeletal disorders. We hypothesized that obesity may also be a co-risk factor for the development of occupational asthma and cardiovascular disease that and it may modify the worker's response to occupational stress, immune response to chemical exposures, and risk of disease from occupational neurotoxins. We developed 5 conceptual models of the interrelationship of work, obesity, and occupational safety and health and highlighted the ethical, legal, and social issues related to fuller consideration of obesity's role in occupational health and safety.
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            • Record: found
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            • Article: not found

            Diet, nutrition and the prevention of chronic diseases: report of a joint WHO/FAO expert consultation

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              • Article: not found

              Gender differences in the consumption of meat, fruit and vegetables are similar in Finland and the Baltic countries.

              Women's diets are healthier than men's. Finnish women eat more fruits and vegetables but less meat than men. Gender differences may be larger in the Baltic countries, which represent Eastern European transition societies than in Finland, a society characterized by the Scandinavian welfare ideology and a high degree of gender equality. The data are based on questionnaires to random samples of adults in Finland, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. The data provide a way of addressing gender differences at the turn of the century in the economically and culturally different countries. The purpose is to explore whether the consumption of foods classified as masculine or feminine-meat, fruits and vegetables-follow a similar gender pattern in Finland and the Baltic countries. Men ate meat more often while women ate fruits and vegetables. A high educational level was associated with frequent consumption of fruits and vegetables. Educational differences in the consumption of meat were few and inconsistent. The consumption of fruits and vegetables was more common in urban areas except in Finland. Gender differences were similar in all countries throughout age and educational groups and in rural and urban areas. The consistent association of gender and food and the similarity of gender patterning in population subgroups point to the stability of masculine versus feminine food habits. The similarity suggests that food habits contribute equally to the gender gap in health in the Baltic countries as they do in Finland.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Ann Afr Med
                Ann Afr Med
                AAM
                Annals of African Medicine
                Medknow Publications & Media Pvt Ltd (India )
                1596-3519
                0975-5764
                Jul-Sep 2021
                17 September 2021
                : 20
                : 3
                : 169-177
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Alex Ekwueme Federal University Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria
                [2 ]Department of Surgery, Alex Ekwueme Federal University Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria
                [3 ]Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Alex Ekwueme Federal University Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria
                [4 ]Department of Physiotherapy, Alex Ekwueme Federal University Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria
                [5 ]Department of Psychiatry, Alex Ekwueme Federal University Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria
                [6 ]Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Alex Ekwueme Federal University Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria
                [7 ]Department of Medicine, Alex Ekwueme Federal University Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria
                [8 ]Department of Technology and Vocational Education, Ebonyi State University, Alex Ekwueme Federal University Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria
                Author notes
                Address for correspondence: Dr. Ugochukwu Uzodimma Nnadozie, Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Alex Ekwueme Federal University Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria. E-mail: ugodozie@ 123456yahoo.ca
                Article
                AAM-20-169
                10.4103/aam.aam_25_20
                8477277
                34558445
                4835a5b5-047c-454d-a4eb-6b358bd39511
                Copyright: © 2021 Annals of African Medicine

                This is an open access journal, and articles are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 License, which allows others to remix, tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as appropriate credit is given and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.

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