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      Signaling Pathways Involved in Mammalian Sex Determination and Gonad Development.

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          Abstract

          The development of any organ system requires a complex interplay of cellular signals to initiate the differentiation and development of the heterogeneous cell and tissue types required to carry out the organs' functions. In this way, an extracellular stimulus is transmitted to an intracellular target through an array of interacting protein intermediaries, ultimately enabling the target cell to elicit a response. Surprisingly, only a small number of signaling pathways are implicated throughout embryogenesis and are used over and over again. Gonadogenesis is a unique process in that 2 morphologically distinct organs, the testes and ovaries, arise from a common precursor, the bipotential genital ridge. Accordingly, most of the signaling pathways observed throughout embryogenesis also have been shown to be important for mammalian sex determination and gonad development. Here, we review the mechanisms of signal transduction within these pathways and the importance of these pathways throughout mammalian gonad development, mainly concentrating on data obtained in mouse but including other species where appropriate.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Sex Dev
          Sexual development : genetics, molecular biology, evolution, endocrinology, embryology, and pathology of sex determination and differentiation
          S. Karger AG
          1661-5433
          1661-5425
          2015
          : 9
          : 6
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Anatomy and Neuroscience, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic., Australia.
          Article
          000444065
          10.1159/000444065
          26905731

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