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      Food commodity pipeline management in transitional settings: challenges and lessons learned from the first USAID food development program in South Sudan

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          Abstract

          Efficient and reliable commodity transport is critical to effective food assistance in development settings as well as in emergency situations. Increasing the flexibility of U.S. government Title II food assistance program procurement regulations and more comprehensive contingency planning could improve the effectiveness of these programs in non-emergency settings with high food insecurity and political volatility.

          Abstract

          Efficient and reliable commodity transport is critical to effective food assistance in development settings as well as in emergency situations. Increasing the flexibility of U.S. government Title II food assistance program procurement regulations and more comprehensive contingency planning could improve the effectiveness of these programs in non-emergency settings with high food insecurity and political volatility.

          ABSTRACT

          Despite decades of support for international food assistance programs by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Office of Food for Peace, relatively little is known about the commodity pipeline and management issues these programs face in post-conflict and politically volatile settings. Based on an audit of the program's commodity tracking system and interviews with 13 key program staff, this case study documents the experiences of organizations implementing the first USAID-funded non-emergency (development) food assistance program approved for Sudan and South Sudan. Key challenges and lessons learned in this experience about food commodity procurement, transport, and management may help improve the design and implementation of future development food assistance programs in a variety of complex, food-insecure settings around the world. Specifically, expanding shipping routes in complex political situations may facilitate reliable and timely commodity delivery. In addition, greater flexibility to procure commodities locally, rather than shipping U.S.-procured commodities, may avoid unnecessary shipping delays and reduce costs.

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          Most cited references 3

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          The Timeliness and Cost-Effectiveness of the Local and Regional Procurement of Food Aid

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            On The Choice and Impacts of Innovative International Food Assistance Instruments

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              Market Prices and Food Aid Local and Regional Procurement and Distribution: A Multi-Country Analysis

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Glob Health Sci Pract
                Glob Health Sci Pract
                ghsp
                ghsp
                Global Health, Science and Practice
                Global Health: Science and Practice
                2169-575X
                August 2013
                14 August 2013
                : 1
                : 2
                : 193-202
                Affiliations
                [a ]Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of International Health , Baltimore, MD, USA
                [b ]Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA) International , Silver Spring, MD, USA
                Author notes
                Correspondence to Shannon Doocy ( sdoocy@ 123456jhsph.edu ).
                Article
                GHSP-D-13-00018
                10.9745/GHSP-D-13-00018
                4168578
                © Tappis et al.

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are properly cited. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

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