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      Current sedation practice among general dental practitioners and dental specialists in Jordan: an example of a developing country

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          Abstract

          Purpose

          The study reported here aimed to identify current sedation practice among general dental practitioners (GDPs) and specialist dental practitioners (SDPs) in Jordan in 2010.

          Methods

          Questionnaires were sent by email to 1683 GDPs and SDPs who were working in Jordan at the time of the study. The contact details of these dental practitioners were obtained from a Jordan Dental Association list. Details on personal status, use of, and training in, conscious sedation techniques were sought by the questionnaires.

          Results

          A total of 1003 (60%) questionnaires were returned, with 748 (86.9%) GDPs and 113 (13.1%) SDPs responding. Only ten (1.3%) GDPs and 63 (55.8%) SDPs provided information on the different types of treatments related to their specialties undertaken under some form of sedation performed by specialist and/or assistant anesthetists. Approximately 0.075% of the Jordanian population received some form of sedation during the year 2010, with approximately 0.054% having been treated by oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The main reason for the majority of GDPs (55.0%) and many SDPs (40%) not to perform sedation was lack of training in this field. While some SDPs (26.0%) indicated they did not use sedation because of the inadequacy of sedative facilities.

          Conclusion

          Within the limitations of the present study, it can be concluded that the provision of conscious sedation services in general and specialist dental practices in Jordan is inconsistent and inadequate. This stresses the great need to train practitioners and dental assistants in Jordan to enable them to safely and effectively perform all forms of sedation.

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          Most cited references 37

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          A screening device: children at risk for dental fears and management problems.

           M Cuthbert,  B Melamed (2015)
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            Dental anxiety in children and its relationship to dental caries and gingival condition.

            The aim of this study was to determine the levels of dental anxiety, dental caries and gingivitis among 12-15-year-old schoolchildren, in Irbid Governorate/northern Jordan, and to evaluate the correlation between these variables. Two schools were selected by a simple random method from each of the five geographic areas in Irbid Governorate. All children (1021), from the 10 selected schools, who participated in this study completed a questionnaire modified from Kleinknecht's Dental Fear Survey (DFS questionnaire). Children underwent oral examination for dental caries and gingival condition, using Decayed, Missing and Filled Teeth (DMFT) Index and Löe and Silness Gingival Index (GI), respectively. Results of this survey showed that the prevalence of low to moderate 'general dental fear' among the study population was 43% while that of 'high dental fear' was 10%. The self-reported 'general fear of dental treatment' was higher among girls than boys. Fear of specific stimuli (pain) was the most common source of dental fear. The sight and sensation of the anaesthetic needle and the sight, sound and sensation of the drill were rated the most fear-eliciting stimuli. The mean DMFT (2.89) and GI (1.80) of boys was not significantly different from the DMFT (3.37) and GI (1.53) of girls (P > 0.05). Spearman's correlation test demonstrated no association between 'general dental fear' and dental caries (r = 0.06) or gingivitis (r = 0.007).
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              Dental attendance and anxiety among public and private school children in Jordan.

              To evaluate the levels of dental attendance and anxiety among children of public (lower to middle socioeconomic groups) and private schools (higher socioeconomic groups), and to explore the perceived source of dental fear among them. A group of 1,021 children selected by a simple random method from 10 public schools in the five geographic areas of Irbid Governate, Jordan and all 10 private schools were included in this study. All children (mean age 13.1 +/- 0.87 years) completed a questionnaire modified from the Dental Fear Scale (DFS) which also contained items related to dental attendance. Private school children (31.4%) visited the dentist regularly more significantly than public school children (15.0%) (P < 0.001). However, the majority of children (public = 82.6%, private = 67.4%) attended the dentist only in an emergency. The main reason for irregular attendance was 'treatment not needed' (42.2%). About 43-44% of children had dental fear of 'low to moderate type', while the prevalence of 'high dental anxiety' was slightly higher among children of public (11.6%) than those of private schools (6.9%). Fear of specific stimuli (pain and trauma) was the most common source of dental fear reactions among 60-65% of children. The sight and sensation of an anaesthetic needle and sight, sound and sensation of the drill were the most fear eliciting stimuli. Moreover, public school children were found to be more anxious with a significantly higher 'overall dental fear' than private school children (P < 0.05).
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Ther Clin Risk Manag
                Ther Clin Risk Manag
                Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
                Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
                Dove Medical Press
                1176-6336
                1178-203X
                2013
                2013
                14 May 2013
                : 9
                : 223-233
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Periodontology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan
                [2 ]Department of Conservative Dentistry and Fixed Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Firas Alsoleihat, Department of Conservative Dentistry and Fixed Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Jordan, Amman 11942, Jordan, Tel +962 777 946 631, Fax +962 6 530 0248, Email firas.alsoleihat@ 123456ju.edu.jo
                Article
                tcrm-9-223
                10.2147/TCRM.S43166
                3660132
                23700369
                © 2013 Al-Shayyab et al, publisher and licensee Dove Medical Press Ltd

                This is an Open Access article which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Categories
                Original Research

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