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      Ecosystem Level Impacts of Invasive Acacia saligna in the South African Fynbos

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      Restoration Ecology

      Wiley-Blackwell

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          Most cited references 9

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          Effects of plant species on nutrient cycling.

           S Hobbie (1992)
          Plant species create positive feedbacks to patterns of nutrient cycling in natural ecosystems. For example, in nutrient-poor ecosystems, plants grow slowly, use nutrients efficiently and produce poor-quality litter that decomposes slowly and deters herbivores. /n contrast, plant species from nutrient-rich ecosystems grow rapidly, produce readily degradable litter and sustain high rates of herbivory, further enhancing rates of nutrient cycling. Plants may also create positive feedbacks to nutrient cycling because of species' differences in carbon deposition and competition with microbes for nutrients in the rhizosphere. New research is showing that species' effects can be as or more important than abiotic factors, such as climate, in controlling ecosystem fertility. Copyright © 1992. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
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            Biological Invasions by Exotic Grasses, the Grass Fire Cycle, and Global Change

             C D'Antonio (1992)
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              Ecosystem services, efficiency, sustainability and equity: South Africa's Working for Water programme

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Restoration Ecology
                Restor Ecology
                Wiley-Blackwell
                1061-2971
                1526-100X
                March 2004
                March 2004
                : 12
                : 1
                : 44-51
                Article
                10.1111/j.1061-2971.2004.00289.x
                © 2004

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