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      Black pepper: Stimulation of diarrhea in patient with underlying short bowel syndrome

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      Ancient Science of Life

      Medknow Publications & Media Pvt Ltd

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          Abstract

          Sir, Black pepper is a well-known plant which has been widely used as regimen in ancient drug remedies. The antibacterial activity of the berries of black pepper is confirmed.[1] As an important drug in Indian Ayurveda remedies, black pepper's usefulness is also confirmed in the management of hyperglycemia and metabolic disruption.[2 3] Focusing on the gastrointestinal effect, there is a new evidence that piperine from black pepper can act against diarrhea.[4] However, we hereby present an observation against this recent finding. The patient is a case with underlying short bowel syndrome with controllable bowel frequency. The patient had just tried adding black pepper as an ingredient to her food and got the acute problem of diarrhea for more than 10 times per day. The stool examination and culture was done and the result was negative. After ceasing of using black pepper, there was complete relief from diarrhea. She performed a self-provocative test by adding black pepper into her food again and the diarrhea problem resurfaced. She also observed that more pepper resulted in greater frequency of diarrhea. The above case gives an interesting data against the observation that black pepper might be useful for control of diarrhea. It is also noted that the patient with underlying bowel disorder (such as short bowel syndrome or irritable bowel syndrome) should be aware of any Ayurveda regimen that may contain black pepper. Financial support and sponsorship Nil. Conflicts of interest There are no conflicts of interest.

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          Potent α-amylase inhibitory activity of Indian Ayurvedic medicinal plants

          Background Indian medicinal plants used in the Ayurvedic traditional system to treat diabetes are a valuable source of novel anti-diabetic agents. Pancreatic α-amylase inhibitors offer an effective strategy to lower the levels of post-prandial hyperglycemia via control of starch breakdown. In this study, seventeen Indian medicinal plants with known hypoglycemic properties were subjected to sequential solvent extraction and tested for α-amylase inhibition, in order to assess and evaluate their inhibitory potential on PPA (porcine pancreatic α-amylase). Preliminary phytochemical analysis of the lead extracts was performed in order to determine the probable constituents. Methods Analysis of the 126 extracts, obtained from 17 plants (Aloe vera (L.) Burm.f., Adansonia digitata L., Allium sativum L., Casia fistula L., Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don., Cinnamomum verum Persl., Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt., Linum usitatisumum L., Mangifera indica L., Morus alba L., Nerium oleander L., Ocimum tenuiflorum L., Piper nigrum L., Terminalia chebula Retz., Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Miers., Trigonella foenum-graceum L., Zingiber officinale Rosc.) for PPA inhibition was initially performed qualitatively by starch-iodine colour assay. The lead extracts were further quantified with respect to PPA inhibition using the chromogenic DNSA (3, 5-dinitrosalicylic acid) method. Phytochemical constituents of the extracts exhibiting≥ 50% inhibition were analysed qualitatively as well as by GC-MS (Gas chromatography-Mass spectrometry). Results Of the 126 extracts obtained from 17 plants, 17 extracts exhibited PPA inhibitory potential to varying degrees (10%-60.5%) while 4 extracts showed low inhibition ( 50%) was obtained with 3 isopropanol extracts. All these 3 extracts exhibited concentration dependent inhibition with IC50 values, viz., seeds of Linum usitatisumum (540 μgml-1), leaves of Morus alba (1440 μgml-1) and Ocimum tenuiflorum (8.9 μgml-1). Acarbose as the standard inhibitor exhibited an IC50 (half maximal inhibitory concentration)value of 10.2 μgml-1. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of alkaloids, tannins, cardiac glycosides, flavonoids, saponins and steroids with the major phytoconstituents being identified by GC-MS. Conclusions This study endorses the use of these plants for further studies to determine their potential for type 2 diabetes management. Results suggests that extracts of Linum usitatisumum, Morus alba and Ocimum tenuiflorum act effectively as PPA inhibitors leading to a reduction in starch hydrolysis and hence eventually to lowered glucose levels.
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            Documentation and quantitative analysis of the local knowledge on medicinal plants among traditional Siddha healers in Virudhunagar district of Tamil Nadu, India.

            India has a population with high degree of medical pluralism. Siddha system of Indian traditional medicine is practiced dominantly by the people in Tamil Nadu. The traditionally trained Siddha healers still play an important role in the rural health care. Their knowledge is comparatively more vulnerable than the documented traditional knowledge. Thus, the present study was aimed to document and quantitatively analyze the local knowledge of the traditional Siddha healers in Virudhunagar district of Tamil Nadu, India.
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              Inhibition of intestinal chloride secretion by piperine as a cellular basis for the anti-secretory effect of black peppers

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Anc Sci Life
                Anc Sci Life
                ASL
                Ancient Science of Life
                Medknow Publications & Media Pvt Ltd (India )
                0257-7941
                2249-9547
                Jan-Mar 2016
                : 35
                : 3
                : 185
                Affiliations
                Vitallife Wellness Center, Bumrungrad International Hospital, Bangkhae, Bangkok, Thailand
                [1 ]Wiwanitkit House, Bangkhae, Bangkok, Thailand
                Author notes
                Address for correspondence: Dr. Kamon Chaiyasit, Vitallife Wellness Center, Bumrungrad International Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand. E-mail: kamolchaiyasit@ 123456hotmail.com
                ASL-35-185
                10.4103/0257-7941.179872
                4850783
                27143806
                Copyright: © Ancient Science of Life

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License, which allows others to remix, tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.

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