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Does Recalling Moral Behavior Change the Perception of Brightness? : A Replication and Meta-Analysis of Banerjee, Chatterjee, and Sinha (2012)

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Social Psychology

Hogrefe Publishing Group

10.1027/1864-9335/a000191

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Conducting Meta-Analyses inRwith themetaforPackage

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Social evaluation by preverbal infants.

The capacity to evaluate other people is essential for navigating the social world. Humans must be able to assess the actions and intentions of the people around them, and make accurate decisions about who is friend and who is foe, who is an appropriate social partner and who is not. Indeed, all social animals benefit from the capacity to identify individual conspecifics that may help them, and to distinguish these individuals from others that may harm them. Human adults evaluate people rapidly and automatically on the basis of both behaviour and physical features, but the ontogenetic origins and development of this capacity are not well understood. Here we show that 6- and 10-month-old infants take into account an individual's actions towards others in evaluating that individual as appealing or aversive: infants prefer an individual who helps another to one who hinders another, prefer a helping individual to a neutral individual, and prefer a neutral individual to a hindering individual. These findings constitute evidence that preverbal infants assess individuals on the basis of their behaviour towards others. This capacity may serve as the foundation for moral thought and action, and its early developmental emergence supports the view that social evaluation is a biological adaptation.
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Investigating Variation in Replicability

Author and article information

Journal
Social Psychology
Social Psychology
Hogrefe Publishing Group
1864-9335
2151-2590
May 2014
May 2014
: 45
: 3
: 246-252
© 2014

The Hogrefe OpenMind License is based on and identical to the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial License Version 3.0. (The full Hogrefe OpenMind license has also been published as an open access article.)

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