11
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Traditional use of the Andean flicker ( Colaptes rupicola) as a galactagogue in the Peruvian Andes

      research-article
      1 ,
      Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
      BioMed Central

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          This paper explores the use of the dried meat and feathers of the Andean Flicker ( Colaptes rupicola) to increase the milk supply of nursing women and domestic animals in the Andes. The treatment is of preColumbian origin, but continues to be used in some areas, including the village in the southern Peruvian highlands where I do ethnographic research. I explore the factors giving rise to and sustaining the practice, relate it to other galactagogues used in the Andes and to the use of birds in ethnomedical and ethnoveterinary treatments in general, and situate it within the general tendency in the Andes and elsewhere to replicate human relations in the treatment of valuable livestock. The bird's use as a galactagogue appears to be motivated by both metaphorical associations and its perceived efficacy, and conceptually blends human and animal healthcare domains.

          Related collections

          Most cited references59

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Beyond discrete biases: Functional and dysfunctional aspects of judgmental heuristics.

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: found
            Is Open Access

            Why study the use of animal products in traditional medicines?

            The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that as many as 80% of the world's more than six billion people rely primarily on animal and plant-based medicines. The healing of human ailments by using therapeutics based on medicines obtained from animals or ultimately derived from them is known as zootherapy. The phenomenon of zootherapy is marked both by a broad geographical distribution and very deep historical origins. Despite their importance, studies on the therapeutic use of animals and animal parts have been neglected, when compared to plants. This paper discusses some related aspects of the use of animals or parts thereof as medicines, and their implications for ecology, culture (the traditional knowledge), economy, and public health.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Lost crop of the Incas: little-known plants of the Andes with promise for worldwide cultivation

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Ethnobiol Ethnomed
                Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
                BioMed Central (London )
                1746-4269
                2006
                6 May 2006
                : 2
                : 23
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Buztindegi, 20213 Idiazabal, Gipuzkoa, Spain
                Article
                1746-4269-2-23
                10.1186/1746-4269-2-23
                1484469
                16677398
                4959dfcb-97b8-4cf4-a15a-7fda6c547a5e
                Copyright © 2006 Froemming; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Categories
                Research

                Health & Social care
                Health & Social care

                Comments

                Comment on this article