1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Successful Invasions and Failed Biocontrol: The Role of Antagonistic Species Interactions

      1 , 2 , 1

      BioScience

      Oxford University Press (OUP)

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Understanding the successes and failures of nonnative species remains challenging. In recent decades, researchers have developed the enemy release hypothesis and other antagonist hypotheses, which posit that nonnative species either fail or succeed in a novel range because of the presence or absence of antagonists. The premise of classical biological control of invasive species is that top-down control works. We identify twelve existing hypotheses that address the roles that antagonists from many trophic levels play during plant and insect invasions in natural environments. We outline a unifying framework of antagonist hypotheses to simplify the relatedness among the hypotheses, incorporate the role of top-down and bottom-up influences on nonnative species, and encourage expansion of experimental assessments of antagonist hypotheses to include belowground and fourth trophic level antagonists. A mechanistic understanding of antagonists and their impacts on nonnative species is critical in a changing world.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 55

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Organization of a Plant-Arthropod Association in Simple and Diverse Habitats: The Fauna of Collards (Brassica Oleracea)

           Richard Root (1973)
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Introduced species and their missing parasites.

            Damage caused by introduced species results from the high population densities and large body sizes that they attain in their new location. Escape from the effects of natural enemies is a frequent explanation given for the success of introduced species. Because some parasites can reduce host density and decrease body size, an invader that leaves parasites behind and encounters few new parasites can experience a demographic release and become a pest. To test whether introduced species are less parasitized, we have compared the parasites of exotic species in their native and introduced ranges, using 26 host species of molluscs, crustaceans, fishes, birds, mammals, amphibians and reptiles. Here we report that the number of parasite species found in native populations is twice that found in exotic populations. In addition, introduced populations are less heavily parasitized (in terms of percentage infected) than are native populations. Reduced parasitization of introduced species has several causes, including reduced probability of the introduction of parasites with exotic species (or early extinction after host establishment), absence of other required hosts in the new location, and the host-specific limitations of native parasites adapting to new hosts.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Novel weapons: invasive success and the evolution of increased competitive ability

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                BioScience
                Oxford University Press (OUP)
                0006-3568
                1525-3244
                September 2019
                September 01 2019
                August 07 2019
                September 2019
                September 01 2019
                August 07 2019
                : 69
                : 9
                : 711-724
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Biological Sciences and the Environmental Science Program, Arkansas State University, Jonesboro, Arkansas
                [2 ]Insects, Diseases, and Invasive Plants Research Work Unit of the US Department of Agriculture Forest Service's Southern Research Station, located, Athens, Georgia, field office
                Article
                10.1093/biosci/biz075
                © 2019

                Comments

                Comment on this article