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Recanalization and Angiographic Reperfusion Are Both Associated with a Favorable Clinical Outcome in the IMS III Trial

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      Abstract

      Background: Prompt revascularization is the main goal of acute ischemic stroke treatment. We examined which revascularization scale - reperfusion (modified Treatment in Cerebral Infarctions, mTICI) or recanalization (Arterial Occlusive Lesion, AOL) - better predicted the clinical outcome in ischemic stroke participants treated with endovascular therapy (EVT). Additionally, we determined the optimal thresholds for the predictive accuracy of each scale. Methods: We included participants from the Interventional Management of Stroke (IMS) III trial with complete occlusion in the internal carotid artery terminus or proximal middle cerebral artery (M1 or M2) who completed EVT within 7 h of symptom onset. The abilities of the AOL and mTICI scales to predict a favorable outcome (defined as a modified Rankin Scale score of 0-2 at 3 months) were compared by receiver operating characteristic analyses. The maximal sensitivity and specificity for each revascularization scale were established. Results: Among 240 participants who met the study inclusion criteria, 79 (33%) achieved a favorable outcome. Higher scores of mTICI and AOL increased the likelihood of a favorable outcome (2.7% with mTICI 0 vs. 83.3% with mTICI 3, and 3.0% with AOL 0 vs. 43% with AOL 3). The accuracy of mTICI reperfusion and AOL recanalization for a favorable outcome prediction was similar, with optimal thresholds of mTICI 2b/3 and AOL 3, respectively. Conclusion: Reperfusion (mTICI) and recanalization (AOL) predicted a favorable clinical outcome with comparable accuracy in ischemic stroke participants treated with EVT. Optimal revascularization goals to maximize clinical outcome (modified Rankin Scale score of 0-2) consisted of complete recanalization (AOL 3) and reperfusion of at least 50% of the arterial tree of the symptomatic artery (mTICI 2b/3) in the IMS III trial setting.

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      A randomized trial of intraarterial treatment for acute ischemic stroke.

      In patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by a proximal intracranial arterial occlusion, intraarterial treatment is highly effective for emergency revascularization. However, proof of a beneficial effect on functional outcome is lacking. We randomly assigned eligible patients to either intraarterial treatment plus usual care or usual care alone. Eligible patients had a proximal arterial occlusion in the anterior cerebral circulation that was confirmed on vessel imaging and that could be treated intraarterially within 6 hours after symptom onset. The primary outcome was the modified Rankin scale score at 90 days; this categorical scale measures functional outcome, with scores ranging from 0 (no symptoms) to 6 (death). The treatment effect was estimated with ordinal logistic regression as a common odds ratio, adjusted for prespecified prognostic factors. The adjusted common odds ratio measured the likelihood that intraarterial treatment would lead to lower modified Rankin scores, as compared with usual care alone (shift analysis). We enrolled 500 patients at 16 medical centers in The Netherlands (233 assigned to intraarterial treatment and 267 to usual care alone). The mean age was 65 years (range, 23 to 96), and 445 patients (89.0%) were treated with intravenous alteplase before randomization. Retrievable stents were used in 190 of the 233 patients (81.5%) assigned to intraarterial treatment. The adjusted common odds ratio was 1.67 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21 to 2.30). There was an absolute difference of 13.5 percentage points (95% CI, 5.9 to 21.2) in the rate of functional independence (modified Rankin score, 0 to 2) in favor of the intervention (32.6% vs. 19.1%). There were no significant differences in mortality or the occurrence of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage. In patients with acute ischemic stroke caused by a proximal intracranial occlusion of the anterior circulation, intraarterial treatment administered within 6 hours after stroke onset was effective and safe. (Funded by the Dutch Heart Foundation and others; MR CLEAN Netherlands Trial Registry number, NTR1804, and Current Controlled Trials number, ISRCTN10888758.).
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        Randomized assessment of rapid endovascular treatment of ischemic stroke.

         Oh Young Bang,  ,  D. Hill (2015)
        Among patients with a proximal vessel occlusion in the anterior circulation, 60 to 80% of patients die within 90 days after stroke onset or do not regain functional independence despite alteplase treatment. We evaluated rapid endovascular treatment in addition to standard care in patients with acute ischemic stroke with a small infarct core, a proximal intracranial arterial occlusion, and moderate-to-good collateral circulation. We randomly assigned participants to receive standard care (control group) or standard care plus endovascular treatment with the use of available thrombectomy devices (intervention group). Patients with a proximal intracranial occlusion in the anterior circulation were included up to 12 hours after symptom onset. Patients with a large infarct core or poor collateral circulation on computed tomography (CT) and CT angiography were excluded. Workflow times were measured against predetermined targets. The primary outcome was the score on the modified Rankin scale (range, 0 [no symptoms] to 6 [death]) at 90 days. A proportional odds model was used to calculate the common odds ratio as a measure of the likelihood that the intervention would lead to lower scores on the modified Rankin scale than would control care (shift analysis). The trial was stopped early because of efficacy. At 22 centers worldwide, 316 participants were enrolled, of whom 238 received intravenous alteplase (120 in the intervention group and 118 in the control group). In the intervention group, the median time from study CT of the head to first reperfusion was 84 minutes. The rate of functional independence (90-day modified Rankin score of 0 to 2) was increased with the intervention (53.0%, vs. 29.3% in the control group; P<0.001). The primary outcome favored the intervention (common odds ratio, 2.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.7 to 3.8; P<0.001), and the intervention was associated with reduced mortality (10.4%, vs. 19.0% in the control group; P=0.04). Symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage occurred in 3.6% of participants in intervention group and 2.7% of participants in control group (P=0.75). Among patients with acute ischemic stroke with a proximal vessel occlusion, a small infarct core, and moderate-to-good collateral circulation, rapid endovascular treatment improved functional outcomes and reduced mortality. (Funded by Covidien and others; ESCAPE ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01778335.).
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          Endovascular therapy for ischemic stroke with perfusion-imaging selection.

          Trials of endovascular therapy for ischemic stroke have produced variable results. We conducted this study to test whether more advanced imaging selection, recently developed devices, and earlier intervention improve outcomes. We randomly assigned patients with ischemic stroke who were receiving 0.9 mg of alteplase per kilogram of body weight less than 4.5 hours after the onset of ischemic stroke either to undergo endovascular thrombectomy with the Solitaire FR (Flow Restoration) stent retriever or to continue receiving alteplase alone. All the patients had occlusion of the internal carotid or middle cerebral artery and evidence of salvageable brain tissue and ischemic core of less than 70 ml on computed tomographic (CT) perfusion imaging. The coprimary outcomes were reperfusion at 24 hours and early neurologic improvement (≥8-point reduction on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale or a score of 0 or 1 at day 3). Secondary outcomes included the functional score on the modified Rankin scale at 90 days. The trial was stopped early because of efficacy after 70 patients had undergone randomization (35 patients in each group). The percentage of ischemic territory that had undergone reperfusion at 24 hours was greater in the endovascular-therapy group than in the alteplase-only group (median, 100% vs. 37%; P<0.001). Endovascular therapy, initiated at a median of 210 minutes after the onset of stroke, increased early neurologic improvement at 3 days (80% vs. 37%, P=0.002) and improved the functional outcome at 90 days, with more patients achieving functional independence (score of 0 to 2 on the modified Rankin scale, 71% vs. 40%; P=0.01). There were no significant differences in rates of death or symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage. In patients with ischemic stroke with a proximal cerebral arterial occlusion and salvageable tissue on CT perfusion imaging, early thrombectomy with the Solitaire FR stent retriever, as compared with alteplase alone, improved reperfusion, early neurologic recovery, and functional outcome. (Funded by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council and others; EXTEND-IA ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01492725, and Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry number, ACTRN12611000969965.).
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            aDepartment of Neurology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; bMedical University of South Carolina (MUSC), Charleston, S.C., cUniversity of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio, and dUniversity of California Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, Calif., USA
            Journal
            INE
            INE
            10.1159/issn.1664-5545
            Interventional Neurology
            Intervent Neurol
            S. Karger AG (Basel, Switzerland karger@ 123456karger.com http://www.karger.com )
            1664-9737
            1664-5545
            September 2016
            16 June 2016
            : 5
            : 3-4
            : 118-122
            INE20160053-4118
            10.1159/000446749
            27781039
            PMC5075813 Intervent Neurol 2016;5:118-122
            © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel

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