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      Anticancer sulfonamides target splicing by inducing RBM39 degradation via recruitment to DCAF15

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          Harnessing Connectivity in a Large-Scale Small-Molecule Sensitivity Dataset.

          Identifying genetic alterations that prime a cancer cell to respond to a particular therapeutic agent can facilitate the development of precision cancer medicines. Cancer cell-line (CCL) profiling of small-molecule sensitivity has emerged as an unbiased method to assess the relationships between genetic or cellular features of CCLs and small-molecule response. Here, we developed annotated cluster multidimensional enrichment analysis to explore the associations between groups of small molecules and groups of CCLs in a new, quantitative sensitivity dataset. This analysis reveals insights into small-molecule mechanisms of action, and genomic features that associate with CCL response to small-molecule treatment. We are able to recapitulate known relationships between FDA-approved therapies and cancer dependencies and to uncover new relationships, including for KRAS-mutant cancers and neuroblastoma. To enable the cancer community to explore these data, and to generate novel hypotheses, we created an updated version of the Cancer Therapeutic Response Portal (CTRP v2).
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            Molecular architecture and assembly of the DDB1-CUL4A ubiquitin ligase machinery.

            Protein ubiquitination is a common form of post-translational modification that regulates a broad spectrum of protein substrates in diverse cellular pathways. Through a three-enzyme (E1-E2-E3) cascade, the attachment of ubiquitin to proteins is catalysed by the E3 ubiquitin ligase, which is best represented by the superfamily of the cullin-RING complexes. Conserved from yeast to human, the DDB1-CUL4-ROC1 complex is a recently identified cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase, which regulates DNA repair, DNA replication and transcription, and can also be subverted by pathogenic viruses to benefit viral infection. Lacking a canonical SKP1-like cullin adaptor and a defined substrate recruitment module, how the DDB1-CUL4-ROC1 E3 apparatus is assembled for ubiquitinating various substrates remains unclear. Here we present crystallographic analyses of the virally hijacked form of the human DDB1-CUL4A-ROC1 machinery, which show that DDB1 uses one beta-propeller domain for cullin scaffold binding and a variably attached separate double-beta-propeller fold for substrate presentation. Through tandem-affinity purification of human DDB1 and CUL4A complexes followed by mass spectrometry analysis, we then identify a novel family of WD40-repeat proteins, which directly bind to the double-propeller fold of DDB1 and serve as the substrate-recruiting module of the E3. Together, our structural and proteomic results reveal the structural mechanisms and molecular logic underlying the assembly and versatility of a new family of cullin-RING E3 complexes.
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              An interactive resource to identify cancer genetic and lineage dependencies targeted by small molecules.

              The high rate of clinical response to protein-kinase-targeting drugs matched to cancer patients with specific genomic alterations has prompted efforts to use cancer cell line (CCL) profiling to identify additional biomarkers of small-molecule sensitivities. We have quantitatively measured the sensitivity of 242 genomically characterized CCLs to an Informer Set of 354 small molecules that target many nodes in cell circuitry, uncovering protein dependencies that: (1) associate with specific cancer-genomic alterations and (2) can be targeted by small molecules. We have created the Cancer Therapeutics Response Portal (http://www.broadinstitute.org/ctrp) to enable users to correlate genetic features to sensitivity in individual lineages and control for confounding factors of CCL profiling. We report a candidate dependency, associating activating mutations in the oncogene β-catenin with sensitivity to the Bcl-2 family antagonist, navitoclax. The resource can be used to develop novel therapeutic hypotheses and to accelerate discovery of drugs matched to patients by their cancer genotype and lineage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Science
                Science
                American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
                0036-8075
                1095-9203
                April 27 2017
                April 28 2017
                : 356
                : 6336
                : eaal3755
                Article
                10.1126/science.aal3755
                49b994d7-6526-416d-9e67-b9d4e7590002
                © 2017

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