19
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Guidelines for the psychosocial and bereavement support of family caregivers of palliative care patients.

      Journal of Palliative Medicine
      Aged, Australia, Bereavement, Caregivers, psychology, Data Collection, Female, Focus Groups, Humans, Interviews as Topic, Male, Palliative Care, Social Support

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Support for family caregivers, including bereavement follow-up, is a core function of palliative care. Many caregivers acknowledge positive aspects associated with the role; however a considerable proportion will experience poor psychological, social, financial, spiritual, and physical well-being and some will suffer from complicated grief. Many family caregivers have unmet needs and would like more information, preparation, and support to assist them in the caregiving role. There is a shortage of evidence-based strategies to guide health professionals in providing optimal support while the caregiver is providing care and after the patient's death. To develop clinical practice guidelines for the psychosocial and bereavement support of family caregivers of palliative care patients. (1) Literature review; (2) focus groups and structured interviews with key stakeholders within Australia; (3) national and international expert opinion to further develop and refine the guidelines using a modified Delphi process; and (4) endorsement of the guidelines from key palliative care, caregiver, and bereavement organizations (national and international). The guidelines were developed for multidisciplinary health care professionals and clinical services commonly involved in caring for adult patients receiving palliative care in a variety of care sites throughout Australia. These consensus-based guidelines have been endorsed key Australian and international organizations. The guidelines may prove valuable for the international palliative care community and for generalist health care providers who occasionally care for palliative care patients. Research is recommended to explore the uptake, implementation, and effectiveness of the guidelines.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          22385026
          3362953
          10.1089/jpm.2011.0466

          Chemistry
          Aged,Australia,Bereavement,Caregivers,psychology,Data Collection,Female,Focus Groups,Humans,Interviews as Topic,Male,Palliative Care,Social Support

          Comments

          Comment on this article