Blog
About

210
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Imaging neural activity in worms, flies and mice with improved GCaMP calcium indicators

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) can be used to image activity in defined neuronal populations. However, current GECIs produce inferior signals compared to synthetic indicators and recording electrodes, precluding detection of low firing rates. We developed a single-wavelength GECI based on GCaMP2 (GCaMP3), with increased baseline fluorescence (3x), dynamic range (3x), and higher affinity for calcium (1.3x). GCaMP3 fluorescence changes triggered by single action potentials were detected in pyramidal cell dendrites, with signal-to-noise ratio and photostability significantly better than GCaMP2, D3cpVenus, and TN-XXL. In Caenorhabditis elegans chemosensory neurons and the Drosophila melanogaster antennal lobe, sensory stimulation-evoked fluorescence responses were significantly enhanced with the new indicator (4–6x). In somatosensory and motor cortical neurons in the intact mouse, GCaMP3 detected calcium transients with amplitudes linearly dependent on action potential number. Long-term imaging in the motor cortex of behaving mice revealed large fluorescence changes in imaged neurons over months.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 40

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Fluorescent indicators for Ca2+ based on green fluorescent proteins and calmodulin.

          Important Ca2+ signals in the cytosol and organelles are often extremely localized and hard to measure. To overcome this problem we have constructed new fluorescent indicators for Ca2+ that are genetically encoded without cofactors and are targetable to specific intracellular locations. We have dubbed these fluorescent indicators 'cameleons'. They consist of tandem fusions of a blue- or cyan-emitting mutant of the green fluorescent protein (GFP), calmodulin, the calmodulin-binding peptide M13, and an enhanced green- or yellow-emitting GFP. Binding of Ca2+ makes calmodulin wrap around the M13 domain, increasing the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the flanking GFPs. Calmodulin mutations can tune the Ca2+ affinities to measure free Ca2+ concentrations in the range 10(-8) to 10(-2) M. We have visualized free Ca2+ dynamics in the cytosol, nucleus and endoplasmic reticulum of single HeLa cells transfected with complementary DNAs encoding chimaeras bearing appropriate localization signals. Ca2+ concentration in the endoplasmic reticulum of individual cells ranged from 60 to 400 microM at rest, and 1 to 50 microM after Ca2+ mobilization. FRET is also an indicator of the reversible intermolecular association of cyan-GFP-labelled calmodulin with yellow-GFP-labelled M13. Thus FRET between GFP mutants can monitor localized Ca2+ signals and protein heterodimerization in individual live cells.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            A simple method for organotypic cultures of nervous tissue.

            Hippocampal slices prepared from 2-23-day-old neonates were maintained in culture at the interface between air and a culture medium. They were placed on a sterile, transparent and porous membrane and kept in petri dishes in an incubator. No plasma clot or roller drum were used. This method yields thin slices which remain 1-4 cell layers thick and are characterized by a well preserved organotypic organization. Pyramidal neurons labelled by extra- and intracellular application of horse radish peroxidase resemble by the organization and complexity of their dendritic processes those observed in situ at a comparable developmental stage. Excitatory and inhibitory synaptic potentials can easily be analysed using extra- or intracellular recording techniques. After a few days in culture, long-term potentiation of synaptic responses can reproducibly be induced. Evidence for a sprouting response during the first days in culture or following sections is illustrated. This technique may represent an interesting alternative to roller tube cultures for studies of the developmental changes occurring during the first days or weeks in culture.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Imaging large-scale neural activity with cellular resolution in awake, mobile mice.

              We report a technique for two-photon fluorescence imaging with cellular resolution in awake, behaving mice with minimal motion artifact. The apparatus combines an upright, table-mounted two-photon microscope with a spherical treadmill consisting of a large, air-supported Styrofoam ball. Mice, with implanted cranial windows, are head restrained under the objective while their limbs rest on the ball's upper surface. Following adaptation to head restraint, mice maneuver on the spherical treadmill as their heads remain motionless. Image sequences demonstrate that running-associated brain motion is limited to approximately 2-5 microm. In addition, motion is predominantly in the focal plane, with little out-of-plane motion, making the application of a custom-designed Hidden-Markov-Model-based motion correction algorithm useful for postprocessing. Behaviorally correlated calcium transients from large neuronal and astrocytic populations were routinely measured, with an estimated motion-induced false positive error rate of <5%.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                101215604
                32338
                Nat Methods
                Nature methods
                1548-7091
                1548-7105
                25 March 2010
                8 November 2009
                December 2009
                1 June 2010
                : 6
                : 12
                : 875-881
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Janelia Farm Research Campus, Ashburn, VA 20147, USA
                [2 ] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Laboratory of Neural Circuits and Behavior, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA
                [4 ] Department of Chemistry, University of Puerto Rico–Río Piedras, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00931
                Author notes
                []Correspondence should be addressed to L. L. L. ( loogerl@ 123456janelia.hhmi.org )
                [3]

                Current address: The Stowers Institute, Kansas City, MO 64110, USA

                Article
                hhmipa186333
                10.1038/nmeth.1398
                2858873
                19898485

                Users may view, print, copy, download and text and data- mine the content in such documents, for the purposes of academic research, subject always to the full Conditions of use: http://www.nature.com/authors/editorial_policies/license.html#terms

                Funding
                Funded by: Howard Hughes Medical Institute
                Award ID: ||HHMI_
                Categories
                Article

                Life sciences

                Comments

                Comment on this article