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      Early aggressive antihypertensive treatment reduces rate of decline in kidney function in diabetic nephropathy.

      Lancet

      Time Factors, Adult, Antihypertensive Agents, pharmacology, therapeutic use, Blood Pressure, drug effects, Diabetes Mellitus, drug therapy, physiopathology, Diabetic Nephropathies, Diuretics, Female, Glomerular Filtration Rate, Humans, Hypertension, Kidney, blood supply, Kidney Failure, Chronic, prevention & control, Male, Metoprolol, Microcirculation, Prospective Studies

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          Abstract

          The effect of early aggressive antihypertensive treatment on kidney function in diabetic nephropathy was studied prospectively in ten insulin-dependent diabetics (mean age 29 years). During the mean pretreatment period of 29 (range 23-38) months the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) decreased significantly and the urinary albumin excretion rate and arterial blood pressure rose significantly. During the 39 month (range 28-48) period of antihypertensive treatment with metoprolol, hydralazine, and frusemide (furosemide) or thiazide, arterial blood pressure fell from 144/97 mm Hg (mean of all pretreatment values) to 128/84 mm Hg (mean of all post-treatment values), urinary albumin excretion from 977 micrograms/min to 433 micrograms/min, and GFR from 80 to 62 ml/min/1 . 73 m2. The rate of decline in GFR decreased from 0.91 ml/min/month before treatment to 0.39 ml/min/month (range 0.08 to 0.68 ml/min/month) during treatment.

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          6133986

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