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      Point-of-care ultrasound education to improve care of dialysis patients

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          Abstract

          <p class="first" id="P1">Point of care ultrasound (POCUS) is rapidly emerging as a bedside diagnostic tool that can enhance physical diagnosis and facilitate clinical decision-making. Although ultrasound is widely used by nephrologists for vascular access and kidney imaging, diagnostic POCUS skills in other anatomic areas are not part of routine nephrology training. In this narrative review, we will provide an overview of selected POCUS techniques, highlight potential uses of POCUS in routine nephrology practice, and describe a new curriculum implemented at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine to teach diagnostic POCUS skills to nephrology fellows. </p>

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          Most cited references49

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          ACC/AHA 2005 Guideline Update for the Diagnosis and Management of Chronic Heart Failure in the Adult: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines (Writing Committee to Update the 2001 Guidelines for the Evaluation and Management of Heart Failure): developed in collaboration with the American College of Chest Physicians and the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation: endorsed by the Heart Rhythm Society.

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            BLUE-protocol and FALLS-protocol: two applications of lung ultrasound in the critically ill.

            This review article describes two protocols adapted from lung ultrasound: the bedside lung ultrasound in emergency (BLUE)-protocol for the immediate diagnosis of acute respiratory failure and the fluid administration limited by lung sonography (FALLS)-protocol for the management of acute circulatory failure. These applications require the mastery of 10 signs indicating normal lung surface (bat sign, lung sliding, A-lines), pleural effusions (quad and sinusoid sign), lung consolidations (fractal and tissue-like sign), interstitial syndrome (lung rockets), and pneumothorax (stratosphere sign and the lung point). These signs have been assessed in adults, with diagnostic accuracies ranging from 90% to 100%, allowing consideration of ultrasound as a reasonable bedside gold standard. In the BLUE-protocol, profiles have been designed for the main diseases (pneumonia, congestive heart failure, COPD, asthma, pulmonary embolism, pneumothorax), with an accuracy > 90%. In the FALLS-protocol, the change from A-lines to lung rockets appears at a threshold of 18 mm Hg of pulmonary artery occlusion pressure, providing a direct biomarker of clinical volemia. The FALLS-protocol sequentially rules out obstructive, then cardiogenic, then hypovolemic shock for expediting the diagnosis of distributive (usually septic) shock. These applications can be done using simple grayscale machines and one microconvex probe suitable for the whole body. Lung ultrasound is a multifaceted tool also useful for decreasing radiation doses (of interest in neonates where the lung signatures are similar to those in adults), from ARDS to trauma management, and from ICUs to points of care. If done in suitable centers, training is the least of the limitations for making use of this kind of visual medicine.
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              The limited reliability of physical signs for estimating hemodynamics in chronic heart failure.

              The cardiovascular physical examination is used commonly as a basis for diagnosis and therapy in chronic heart failure, although the relationship between physical signs, increased ventricular filling pressure, and decreased cardiac output has not been established for this population. We prospectively compared physical signs with hemodynamic measurements in 50 patients with known chronic heart failure (ejection fraction, .18 +/- .06). Rales, edema, and elevated mean jugular venous pressure were absent in 18 of 43 patients with pulmonary capillary wedge pressures greater than or equal to 22 mm Hg, for which the combination of these signs had 58% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Proportional pulse pressure correlated well with cardiac index (r = .82), and when less than 25% pulse pressure had 91% sensitivity and 83% specificity for a cardiac index less than 2.2 L/min/m2. In chronic heart failure, reliance on physical signs for elevated ventricular filling pressure might result in inadequate therapy. Conversely, the adequacy of cardiac output is assessed reliably by pulse pressure. Our results facilitate decisions regarding treatment in chronic heart failure.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Seminars in Dialysis
                Semin Dial
                Wiley-Blackwell
                08940959
                January 03 2018
                :
                :
                Article
                10.1111/sdi.12664
                5839962
                29314256
                4a47b1d4-fec0-43f5-91b0-6aad0782091e
                © 2018

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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