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      Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

      1 , 2
      The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry
      SAGE Publications

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          Young adult outcome of autism spectrum disorders.

          To learn about the lives of young adults with ASD, families with children born 1974-1984, diagnosed as preschoolers and followed into adolescence were contacted by mail. Of 76 eligible, 48 (63%) participated in a telephone interview. Global outcome scores were assigned based on work, friendships and independence. At mean age 24, half had good to fair outcome and 46% poor. Co-morbid conditions, obesity and medication use were common. Families noted unmet needs particularly in social areas. Multilinear regression indicated a combination of IQ and CARS score at age 11 predicted outcome. Earlier studies reported more adults with ASD who had poor to very poor outcomes, however current young people had more opportunities, and thus better results were expected.
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            Employment and post-secondary educational activities for young adults with autism spectrum disorders during the transition to adulthood.

            This report describes the post-high school educational and occupational activities for 66 young adults with autism spectrum disorders who had recently exited the secondary school system. Analyses indicated low rates of employment in the community, with the majority of young adults (56%) spending time in sheltered workshops or day activity centers. Young adults with ASD without an intellectual disability were three times more likely to have no daytime activities compared to adults with ASD who had an intellectual disability. Differences in behavioral functioning were observed by employment/day activity group. Our findings suggest that the current service system may be inadequate to accommodate the needs of youths with ASD who do not have intellectual disabilities during the transition to adulthood.
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              Trajectory of development in adolescents and adults with autism.

              This article seeks to elucidate the trajectory of development in adolescents and adults with autism. Prospective, retrospective, and cross-sectional studies are reviewed to reveal the manifestation of and changes in the core symptoms of autism in adolescence and adulthood. Comparing children with adolescents and adults, modest degrees of symptom abatement and improvement in skills have been documented in multiple studies, as are increases in verbal and decreases in performance IQ. Nevertheless, most individuals do not attain normative outcomes in adulthood and continue to manifest significant degrees of symptomatology and dependency. However, a small sub-group (about 15%) has more favorable adult outcomes. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry
                Can J Psychiatry
                SAGE Publications
                0706-7437
                1497-0015
                May 2012
                May 2012
                May 2012
                May 2012
                : 57
                : 5
                : 275-283
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Professor of Clinical Child Psychology, Department of Psychology, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, England
                [2 ] Research Assistant, Department of Psychology, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, England
                Article
                10.1177/070674371205700502
                22546059
                4a66b623-dddf-4f55-b1c1-c4a9f68cd437
                © 2012

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