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      A new species of Micropterix Hübner, 1825 from the Orobian Alps (Italy) (Lepidoptera, Micropterigidae)

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      Nota Lepidopterologica

      Pensoft Publishers

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          Abstract

          Micropterix gaudiella Zeller & Huemer, sp. n. is described from the southern part of the Orobian Alps (Piedmont, Italy) and compared with its likely closest relatives Micropterix isobasella Staudinger, 1871 and Micropterix stuebneri Zeller, Werno & Kurz, 2013. The new species is well characterized by its wing pattern and colour and by structures of the male genitalia. The species status is furthermore supported by molecular data of the DNA barcode region. The distance to its nearest neighbour Micropterix schaefferi Heath, 1975 is 2.65%. M. gaudiella is the seventh species of the genus Micropterix Hübner, 1825 probably endemic to the Alps.

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          Most cited references 5

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          An inexpensive, automation-friendly protocol for recovering high-quality DNA

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            Allopatric distribution and diversification without niche shift in a bryophyte-feeding basal moth lineage (Lepidoptera: Micropterigidae).

            The Lepidoptera represent one of the most successful radiations of plant-feeding insects, which predominantly took place within angiosperms beginning in the Cretaceous period. Angiosperm colonization is thought to underlie the evolutionary success of the Lepidoptera because angiosperms provide an enormous range of niches for ecological speciation to take place. By contrast, the basal lepidopteran lineage, Micropterigidae, remained unassociated with angiosperms since Jurassic times but nevertheless achieved a modest diversity in the Japanese Archipelago. We explored the causes and processes of diversification of the Japanese micropterigid moths by performing molecular phylogenetic analysis and extensive ecological surveying. Phylogenetic analysis recovered a monophyletic group of approximately 25 East Asian endemic species that feed exclusively on the liverwort Conocephalum conicum, suggesting that niche shifts hardly played a role in their diversification. Consistent with the low flying ability of micropterigid moths, the distributions of the Conocephalum specialists are each localized and allopatric, indicating that speciation by geographical isolation has been the major process shaping the diversity of Japanese Micropterigidae. To our knowledge, this is the largest radiation of herbivorous insects that does not accompany any apparent niche differentiation. We suggest that the significance of non-ecological speciation during the diversification of the Lepidoptera is commonly underestimated.
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              DNA mini-barcodes in taxonomic assignment: a morphologically unique new homoneurous moth clade from the Indian Himalayas described in Micropterix (Lepidoptera, Micropterigidae): Morphologically unique micropterigid moths

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nota Lepidopterologica
                NL
                Pensoft Publishers
                2367-5365
                0342-7536
                October 22 2015
                October 22 2015
                : 38
                : 2
                : 133-146
                Article
                10.3897/nl.38.5058
                © 2015
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