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      DPVweb: a comprehensive database of plant and fungal virus genes and genomes

      * ,

      Nucleic Acids Research

      Oxford University Press

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          Abstract

          DPVweb ( http://www.dpvweb.net/) provides a central source of information about viruses, viroids and satellites of plants, fungi and protozoa. Comprehensive taxonomic information, including brief descriptions of each family and genus, and classified lists of virus sequences are provided. The database also holds detailed, curated, information for all sequences of viruses, viroids and satellites of plants, fungi and protozoa that are complete or that contain at least one complete gene (currently, n ≈ 9000). For comparative purposes, it also contains a single representative sequence of all other fully sequenced virus species with an RNA or single-stranded DNA genome. The start and end positions of each feature (gene, non-translated region and the like) have been recorded and checked for accuracy. As far as possible, nomenclature for genes and proteins are standardized within genera and families. Sequences of features (either as DNA or amino acid sequences) can be directly downloaded from the website in FASTA format. The sequence information can also be accessed via client software for PC computers (freely downloadable from the website) that enable users to make an easy selection of sequences and features of a chosen virus for further analyses.

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          Most cited references 6

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          Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information

          In addition to maintaining the GenBank(R) nucleic acid sequence database, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) provides data retrieval systems and computational resources for the analysis of data in GenBank and other biological data made available through NCBI's website. NCBI resources include Entrez, Entrez Programming Utilities, PubMed, PubMed Central, Entrez Gene, the NCBI Taxonomy Browser, BLAST, BLAST Link (BLink), Electronic PCR, OrfFinder, Spidey, RefSeq, UniGene, HomoloGene, ProtEST, dbMHC, dbSNP, Cancer Chromosomes, Entrez Genomes and related tools, the Map Viewer, Model Maker, Evidence Viewer, Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs), Retroviral Genotyping Tools, HIV-1/Human Protein Interaction Database, SAGEmap, Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), the Molecular Modeling Database (MMDB), the Conserved Domain Database (CDD) and the Conserved Domain Architecture Retrieval Tool (CDART). Augmenting many of the Web applications are custom implementations of the BLAST program optimized to search specialized datasets. All of the resources can be accessed through the NCBI home page at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.
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            Molecular criteria for genus and species discrimination within the family Potyviridae.

            A phylogenetic analysis of the optimised nucleotide (nt) alignment of the entire ORFs of a representative of each fully-sequenced species in the family Potyviridae provided strong support for several subgroups within the genus Potyvirus. A complete set of two-way comparisons was done between the sequences for the entire ORF and for each gene amongst all the 187 complete sequences from the family. Most species had 50-55% nt identity to other members of their genus in their ORFs but there were significant groups of more closely related species and species demarcation criteria were <76% nt identity and <82% amino acid identity. The corresponding thresholds for species demaracation using nt identity values for the individual genes ranged from 58% (P1 gene) to 74-78% (other genes) although a few comparisons between different species exceeded these values. For the entire ORF, genus demarcation criteria were <46% nt identity but this did not separate rymoviruses from potyviruses. Comparisons in the CI gene most accurately reflected those for the complete ORF and this region would therefore be the best for diagnostic and taxonomic studies if only a sub-portion of the genome is to be sequenced. Further comparisons were then made using all the 1220 complete capsid protein (CP) genes. These studies suggest that 76-77% nt identity is the optimal species demarcation criterion for the CP. The study has also helped to allocate the correct virus name to some sequences from the international databases that currently have incorrect or redundant names. The taxonomic status of the current genus Rymovirus and of three unassigned species in the family is discussed. Significant discontinuities in the distributions within and between the currently defined species suggest that the continuum of variation that is theoretically available is constrained or disrupted by molecular barriers that must have some biological significance.
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              The new plant virus family Flexiviridae and assessment of molecular criteria for species demarcation.

              The new plant virus family Flexiviridae is described. The family is named because its members have flexuous virions and it includes the existing genera Allexivirus, Capillovirus, Carlavirus, Foveavirus, Potexvirus, Trichovirus and Vitivirus, plus the new genus Mandarivirus together with some related viruses not assigned to any genus. The family is justified from phylogenetic analyses of the polymerase and coat protein (CP) sequences. To help to define suitable molecular criteria for demarcation of species, a complete set of pairwise comparisons was made using the nucleotide (nt) and amino acid (aa) sequences of each fully-sequenced gene from every available accession in the family. Based on the distributions and on inspection of the data, it was concluded that, as a general rule, distinct species have less than ca. 72% identical nt or 80% identical aa between their entire CP or replication protein genes.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nucleic Acids Res
                Nucleic Acids Research
                Nucleic Acids Research
                Oxford University Press
                0305-1048
                1362-4962
                01 January 2006
                01 January 2006
                28 December 2005
                : 34
                : Database issue
                : D382-D385
                Affiliations
                Plant-Pathogen Interactions Division, Wheat Pathogenesis Programme, Rothamsted Research Harpenden, Herts AL5 2JQ, UK
                Author notes
                *To whom correspondence should be addressed. Tel: +44 1582 763133; Fax: +44 1582 760981; Email: mike.adams@ 123456bbsrc.ac.uk
                Article
                10.1093/nar/gkj023
                1347386
                16381892
                © The Author 2006. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved

                The online version of this article has been published under an open access model. Users are entitled to use, reproduce, disseminate, or display the open access version of this article for non-commercial purposes provided that: the original authorship is properly and fully attributed; the Journal and Oxford University Press are attributed as the original place of publication with the correct citation details given; if an article is subsequently reproduced or disseminated not in its entirety but only in part or as a derivative work this must be clearly indicated. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@ 123456oxfordjournals.org

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