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      Interleukin (IL)-6 Directs the Differentiation of IL-4–producing CD4 + T Cells

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          Abstract

          Interleukin (IL)-4 is the most potent factor that causes naive CD4 + T cells to differentiate to the T helper cell (Th) 2 phenotype, while IL-12 and interferon γ trigger the differentiation of Th1 cells. However, the source of the initial polarizing IL-4 remains unclear. Here, we show that IL-6, probably secreted by antigen-presenting cells, is able to polarize naive CD4 + T cells to effector Th2 cells by inducing the initial production of IL-4 in CD4 + T cells. These results show that the nature of the cytokine (IL-12 or IL-6), which is produced by antigen-presenting cells in response to a particular pathogen, is a key factor in determining the nature of the immune response.

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          Most cited references 42

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          Single-step method of RNA isolation by acid guanidinium thiocyanate-phenol-chloroform extraction.

          A new method of total RNA isolation by a single extraction with an acid guanidinium thiocyanate-phenol-chloroform mixture is described. The method provides a pure preparation of undegraded RNA in high yield and can be completed within 4 h. It is particularly useful for processing large numbers of samples and for isolation of RNA from minute quantities of cells or tissue samples.
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            IL-10 inhibits cytokine production by activated macrophages.

            IL-10 inhibits the ability of macrophage but not B cell APC to stimulate cytokine synthesis by Th1 T cell clones. In this study we have examined the direct effects of IL-10 on both macrophage cell lines and normal peritoneal macrophages. LPS (or LPS and IFN-gamma)-induced production of IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-alpha proteins was significantly inhibited by IL-10 in two macrophage cell lines. Furthermore, IL-10 appears to be a more potent inhibitor of monokine synthesis than IL-4 when added at similar concentrations. LPS or LPS- and IFN-gamma-induced expression of IL-1 alpha, IL-6, or TNF-alpha mRNA was also inhibited by IL-10 as shown by semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction or Northern blot analysis. Inhibition of LPS-induced IL-6 secretion by IL-10 was less marked in FACS-purified peritoneal macrophages than in the macrophage cell lines. However, IL-6 production by peritoneal macrophages was enhanced by addition of anti-IL-10 antibodies, implying the presence in these cultures of endogenous IL-10, which results in an intrinsic reduction of monokine synthesis after LPS activation. Consistent with this proposal, LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophages were shown to directly produce IL-10 detectable by ELISA. Furthermore, IFN-gamma was found to enhance IL-6 production by LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophages, and this could be explained by its suppression of IL-10 production by this same population of cells. In addition to its effects on monokine synthesis, IL-10 also induces a significant change in morphology in IFN-gamma-stimulated peritoneal macrophages. The potent action of IL-10 on the macrophage, particularly at the level of monokine production, supports an important role for this cytokine not only in the regulation of T cell responses but also in acute inflammatory responses.
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              Development of TH1 CD4+ T cells through IL-12 produced by Listeria-induced macrophages.

              Development of the appropriate CD4+ T helper (TH) subset during an immune response is important for disease resolution. With the use of naïve, ovalbumin-specific alpha beta T cell receptor transgenic T cell, it was found that heat-killed Listeria monocytogenes induced TH1 development in vitro through macrophage production of interleukin-12 (IL-12). Moreover, inhibition of macrophage production of IL-12 may explain the ability of IL-10 to suppress TH1 development. Murine immune responses to L. monocytogenes in vivo are of the appropriate TH1 phenotype. Therefore, this regulatory pathway may have evolved to enable innate immune cells, through interactions with microbial pathogens, to direct development of specific immunity toward the appropriate TH phenotype.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Exp Med
                The Journal of Experimental Medicine
                The Rockefeller University Press
                0022-1007
                1540-9538
                3 February 1997
                : 185
                : 3
                : 461-470
                Affiliations
                From the [* ]Section of Immunobiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8011; []Section of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-9031; and [§ ]Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8011
                Author notes

                Address correspondence to Dr. Richard A. Flavell, Section of Immunobiology, Yale University School of Medicine, PO Box 208011, New Haven, CT 06520-8011. M. Rincón's present address is the University of Vermont, Department of Medicine, Given Medical Bldg., Burlington, VT.

                Article
                2196041
                9053446
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                Medicine

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