7
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      HPCA1 is required for systemic reactive oxygen species and calcium cell-to-cell signaling and plant acclimation to stress

      , , , ,
      The Plant Cell
      Oxford University Press (OUP)

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Reactive oxygen species (ROS), produced by respiratory burst oxidase homologs (RBOHs) at the apoplast, play a key role in local and systemic cell-to-cell signaling, required for plant acclimation to stress. Here we reveal that the Arabidopsis thaliana leucine-rich-repeat receptor-like kinase H2O2-INDUCED CA2+ INCREASES 1 (HPCA1) acts as a central ROS receptor required for the propagation of cell-to-cell ROS signals, systemic signaling in response to different biotic and abiotic stresses, stress responses at the local and systemic tissues, and plant acclimation to stress, following a local treatment of high light (HL) stress. We further report that HPCA1 is required for systemic calcium signals, but not systemic membrane depolarization responses, and identify the calcium-permeable channel MECHANOSENSITIVE ION CHANNEL LIKE 3, CALCINEURIN B-LIKE CALCIUM SENSOR 4 (CBL4), CBL4-INTERACTING PROTEIN KINASE 26 and Sucrose-non-fermenting-1-related Protein Kinase 2.6/OPEN STOMATA 1 (OST1) as required for the propagation of cell-to-cell ROS signals. In addition, we identify serine residues S343 and S347 of RBOHD (the putative targets of OST1) as playing a key role in cell-to-cell ROS signaling in response to a local application of HL stress. Our findings reveal that HPCA1 plays a key role in mediating and coordinating systemic cell-to-cell ROS and calcium signals required for plant acclimation to stress.

          Related collections

          Most cited references58

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Floral dip: a simplified method forAgrobacterium-mediated transformation ofArabidopsis thaliana

          The Agrobacterium vacuum infiltration method has made it possible to transform Arabidopsis thaliana without plant tissue culture or regeneration. In the present study, this method was evaluated and a substantially modified transformation method was developed. The labor-intensive vacuum infiltration process was eliminated in favor of simple dipping of developing floral tissues into a solution containing Agrobacterium tumefaciens, 5% sucrose and 500 microliters per litre of surfactant Silwet L-77. Sucrose and surfactant were critical to the success of the floral dip method. Plants inoculated when numerous immature floral buds and few siliques were present produced transformed progeny at the highest rate. Plant tissue culture media, the hormone benzylamino purine and pH adjustment were unnecessary, and Agrobacterium could be applied to plants at a range of cell densities. Repeated application of Agrobacterium improved transformation rates and overall yield of transformants approximately twofold. Covering plants for 1 day to retain humidity after inoculation also raised transformation rates twofold. Multiple ecotypes were transformable by this method. The modified method should facilitate high-throughput transformation of Arabidopsis for efforts such as T-DNA gene tagging, positional cloning, or attempts at targeted gene replacement.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            ROS function in redox signaling and oxidative stress.

            Oxidative stress refers to elevated intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause damage to lipids, proteins and DNA. Oxidative stress has been linked to a myriad of pathologies. However, elevated ROS also act as signaling molecules in the maintenance of physiological functions--a process termed redox biology. In this review we discuss the two faces of ROS--redox biology and oxidative stress--and their contribution to both physiological and pathological conditions. Redox biology involves a small increase in ROS levels that activates signaling pathways to initiate biological processes, while oxidative stress denotes high levels of ROS that result in damage to DNA, protein or lipids. Thus, the response to ROS displays hormesis, given that the opposite effect is observed at low levels compared with that seen at high levels. Here, we argue that redox biology, rather than oxidative stress, underlies physiological and pathological conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Genome-wide insertional mutagenesis of Arabidopsis thaliana.

              J Alonso (2003)
              Over 225,000 independent Agrobacterium transferred DNA (T-DNA) insertion events in the genome of the reference plant Arabidopsis thaliana have been created that represent near saturation of the gene space. The precise locations were determined for more than 88,000 T-DNA insertions, which resulted in the identification of mutations in more than 21,700 of the approximately 29,454 predicted Arabidopsis genes. Genome-wide analysis of the distribution of integration events revealed the existence of a large integration site bias at both the chromosome and gene levels. Insertion mutations were identified in genes that are regulated in response to the plant hormone ethylene.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                The Plant Cell
                Oxford University Press (OUP)
                1040-4651
                1532-298X
                August 04 2022
                August 04 2022
                Article
                10.1093/plcell/koac241
                35929088
                4b6ca98b-680d-4565-8e07-54ae1013ee4c
                © 2022

                https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article