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      Surface and deep-water variability at the Blake Ridge, NW Atlantic during the Plio-Pleistocene is linked to the closing of the Central American Seaway

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      Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology
      Elsevier BV

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          Vertical distribution and isotopic fractionation of living planktonic foraminifera from the Panama Basin

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            Abrupt changes in the Asian southwest monsoon during the Holocene and their links to the North Atlantic Ocean.

            During the last ice age, the Indian Ocean southwest monsoon exhibited abrupt changes that were closely correlated with millennial-scale climate events in the North Atlantic region, suggesting a mechanistic link. In the Holocene epoch, which had a more stable climate, the amplitude of abrupt changes in North Atlantic climate was much smaller, and it has been unclear whether these changes are related to monsoon variability. Here we present a continuous record of centennial-scale monsoon variability throughout the Holocene from rapidly accumulating and minimally bioturbated sediments in the anoxic Arabian Sea. Our monsoon proxy record reveals several intervals of weak summer monsoon that coincide with cold periods documented in the North Atlantic region--including the most recent climate changes from the Medieval Warm Period to the Little Ice Age and then to the present. We therefore suggest that the link between North Atlantic climate and the Asian monsoon is a persistent aspect of global climate.
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              Regional climate shifts caused by gradual global cooling in the Pliocene epoch.

              The Earth's climate has undergone a global transition over the past four million years, from warm conditions with global surface temperatures about 3 degrees C warmer than today, smaller ice sheets and higher sea levels to the current cooler conditions. Tectonic changes and their influence on ocean heat transport have been suggested as forcing factors for that transition, including the onset of significant Northern Hemisphere glaciation approximately 2.75 million years ago, but the ultimate causes for the climatic changes are still under debate. Here we compare climate records from high latitudes, subtropical regions and the tropics, indicating that the onset of large glacial/interglacial cycles did not coincide with a specific climate reorganization event at lower latitudes. The regional differences in the timing of cooling imply that global cooling was a gradual process, rather than the response to a single threshold or episodic event as previously suggested. We also find that high-latitude climate sensitivity to variations in solar heating increased gradually, culminating after cool tropical and subtropical upwelling conditions were established two million years ago. Our results suggest that mean low-latitude climate conditions can significantly influence global climate feedbacks.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology
                Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology
                Elsevier BV
                00310182
                April 2014
                April 2014
                : 399
                : 345-351
                Article
                10.1016/j.palaeo.2014.02.001
                4c21b14b-7687-426c-b09b-cd33bfd16bf6
                © 2014
                History

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