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      Unusual chromosomal polymorphism of the common shrew, Sorex araneus L., in southern Belarus

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          Abstract

          Analysis of the frequency of karyotypes and chromosomal rearrangements in the distributional ranges of four metacentric races of Sorex araneus Linnaeus, 1758 has revealed features that are not typical for polymorphic populations of this species. The frequency of the acrocentric karyotype and heterozygotes for fusion of acrocentric chromosomes turned out to be significantly higher than expected in case of random crossing. As an explanation for the unusual polymorphism, it has been suggested that metacentric races may hybridize with acrocentric populations that remained from the ancient chromosomal form.

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          Most cited references 21

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          A colchicine, hypotonic citrate, squash sequence for mammalian chromosomes.

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            A RAPID BANDING TECHNIQUE FOR HUMAN CHROMOSOMES

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              Factors responsible for a karyotypic polymorphism in the common shrew, Sorex araneus.

               Jeremy Searle (1986)
              A Robertsonian karyotypic polymorphism in the common shrew in the Oxford area, first described in the 1950s, was re-examined. The polymorphism involves chromosome arm combinations kq, no and pr (characteristic of the Oxford karyotypic race), ko (characteristic of the Hermitage karyotypic race) and jl (found in both races). The polymorphism for jl was sporadic along a north-south transect through the Oxford area, with the frequency of the twin-acrocentric morph never exceeding 10%. The frequency of the Oxford race-specific metacentrics decreased and the frequency of the Hermitage race-specific metacentric ko increased from north to south along the transect. At a latitudinal grid reference of about 180 km, there was a high frequency of individuals with chromosome arms k, n, o and q in the ancestral acrocentric state. This was coincident with the area of occurrence of ko-kq and ko-no Oxford-Hermitage hybrids. Such hybrids are double Robertsonian heterozygotes with monobrachial homology and are likely to suffer reduced fertility in consequence. It is proposed that this is a source of selection against the monobrachial hybrids and hence results in an increase in frequency of the acrocentric morphs. This scheme goes some way to explain the clines of polymorphism for arm combinations kq, no and ko, but it is suggested that other selective factors are involved. It cannot explain the cline of polymorphism for pr, which is in general terms similar to that for kq and no, but is more shallow and centred further north.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Comp Cytogenet
                Comp Cytogenet
                8
                urn:lsid:arphahub.com:pub:A71ED5FC-60ED-5DA3-AC8E-F6D2BB5B3573
                urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:C8FA3ADA-5585-4F26-9215-A520EE683979
                Comparative Cytogenetics
                Pensoft Publishers
                1993-0771
                1993-078X
                2021
                04 June 2021
                : 15
                : 2
                : 159-169
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Scientific and Practical Center for Bioresources, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Akademicheskaya St. 27, 220072 Minsk, Belarus National Academy of Sciences of Belarus Minsk Belarus
                [2 ] Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution, Russian Academy of Scences, Leninskij Prosp. 33, 119071 Moscow, Russia Russian Academy of Scences Moscow Russia
                Author notes
                Corresponding author: Iryna A. Kryshchuk ( ikryshchuk@ 123456yandex.by )

                Academic editor: Svetlana Galkina

                Article
                63084
                10.3897/CompCytogen.v15.i2.63084
                8195942
                Iryna A. Kryshchuk, Victor N. Orlov, Elena V. Cherepanova, Yuri M. Borisov

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Categories
                Research Article
                Chordata
                Evolutionary Biology
                Genetics
                Cenozoic
                Europe

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