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      Quantum Monte Carlo calculation of neutral-current \(\nu -{}^{12}\mathrm{C}\) inclusive quasielastic scattering

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          Most cited references 19

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          An accurate nucleon-nucleon potential with charge-independence breaking

          We present a new high-quality nucleon-nucleon potential with explicit charge dependence and charge asymmetry, which we designate Argonne \(v_{18}\). The model has a charge-independent part with fourteen operator components that is an updated version of the Argonne \(v_{14}\) potential. Three additional charge-dependent and one charge-asymmetric operators are added, along with a complete electromagnetic interaction. The potential has been fit directly to the Nijmegen \(pp\) and \(np\) scattering data base, low-energy \(nn\) scattering parameters, and deuteron binding energy. With 40 adjustable parameters it gives a \(\chi^{2}\) per datum of 1.09 for 4301 \(pp\) and \(np\) data in the range 0--350 MeV.
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            Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Light Nuclei

            Accurate quantum Monte Carlo calculations of ground and low-lying excited states of light p-shell nuclei are now possible for realistic nuclear Hamiltonians that fit nucleon-nucleon scattering data. At present, results for more than 30 different (J^pi;T) states, plus isobaric analogs, in A \leq 8 nuclei have been obtained with an excellent reproduction of the experimental energy spectrum. These microscopic calculations show that nuclear structure, including both single-particle and clustering aspects, can be explained starting from elementary two- and three-nucleon interactions. Various density and momentum distributions, electromagnetic form factors, and spectroscopic factors have also been computed, as well as electroweak capture reactions of astrophysical interest.
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              Quantum Monte Carlo methods for nuclear physics

               ,  ,   (2015)
              Quantum Monte Carlo methods have proved very valuable to study the structure and reactions of light nuclei and nucleonic matter starting from realistic nuclear interactions and currents. These ab-initio calculations reproduce many low-lying states, moments and transitions in light nuclei, and simultaneously predict many properties of light nuclei and neutron matter over a rather wide range of energy and momenta. We review the nuclear interactions and currents, and describe the continuum Quantum Monte Carlo methods used in nuclear physics. These methods are similar to those used in condensed matter and electronic structure but naturally include spin-isospin, tensor, spin-orbit, and three-body interactions. We present a variety of results including the low-lying spectra of light nuclei, nuclear form factors, and transition matrix elements. We also describe low-energy scattering techniques, studies of the electroweak response of nuclei relevant in electron and neutrino scattering, and the properties of dense nucleonic matter as found in neutron stars. A coherent picture of nuclear structure and dynamics emerges based upon rather simple but realistic interactions and currents.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                PRVCAN
                Physical Review C
                Phys. Rev. C
                American Physical Society (APS)
                2469-9985
                2469-9993
                February 2018
                February 28 2018
                : 97
                : 2
                Article
                10.1103/PhysRevC.97.022502
                © 2018

                https://link.aps.org/licenses/aps-default-license

                https://link.aps.org/licenses/aps-default-accepted-manuscript-license

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