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      Reactive oxygen species and the central nervous system in salt-sensitive hypertension: possible relationship with obesity-induced hypertension.

      1 ,

      Clinical and experimental pharmacology & physiology

      Wiley

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          Abstract

          1. There are multiple and complex mechanisms of salt-induced hypertension; however, central sympathoexcitation plays an important role. In addition, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is increased in salt-sensitive hypertensive humans and animals. Thus, we hypothesized that brain ROS overproduction may increase blood pressure (BP) by central sympathostimulation. 2. Recently, we demonstrated that ROS levels were elevated in the hypothalamus of salt-sensitive hypertensive animals. Moreover, intracerebroventricular anti-oxidants suppressed BP and renal sympathetic nerve activity more in salt-sensitive than non-salt-sensitive hypertensive rats. Thus, brain ROS overproduction increased BP through central sympathoexcitation in salt-sensitive hypertension. 3. Salt sensitivity of BP is enhanced in obesity and metabolic syndrome. Interestingly, it is also suggested that, in obesity-induced hypertension models, increases in BP are caused by brain ROS-induced central sympathoexcitation. 4. Recent studies suggest that increased ROS production in the brain and central sympathoexcitation may share a common pathway that increases BP in both salt- and obesity-induced hypertension.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Clin. Exp. Pharmacol. Physiol.
          Clinical and experimental pharmacology & physiology
          Wiley
          1440-1681
          0305-1870
          Jan 2012
          : 39
          : 1
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Nephrology and Endocrinology, University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. katsua-tky@umin.ac.jp
          Article
          10.1111/j.1440-1681.2011.05510.x
          21388436

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